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I'm having a hard time trying to understand other people's codes here. I would really appreciate if someone helps me.

Let's say there is an array of object : vpair_list and this vpair_list has a type of class of vpair. So, it would be like this:

class vpair
{
public:
    int vid;
    int vlabel;
};

bool operator < (const vpair& x, const vpair& y);

vpair* vpair_list;
vpair_list = new vpair[25];
..
sort(vpair_list, vpair_list+j);

What I know from that is sort() compares each element of array vpair_list and sorts them.

The thing is that I just can't understand how that sorting works since the object vpair has two different properties.

Does the sorting work like comparing each property(vid and vlabel) or....? What I thought was the sorting was supposed to be done by comparing specific field or property (either vid or vlabel here).

But this code hasn't got anything to do with that and seems like it just compares the whole object. Could someone tell me how that works?

Thank you in advance.

share|improve this question
    
The sorting is done by calling the operator. You've declared it, but you haven't defined it yet. –  Kerrek SB Jan 4 '13 at 0:57
1  
It uses operator<, however that is implemented... –  Yuushi Jan 4 '13 at 0:57
    
Thank you so much guys. But what I meant was which field that 'operator <' compares. Does it compare both vid and vlabel and if so, what happens if (vpair_list[0].vid < vpair_list[1].vid) and (vpair_list[0].vlabel > vpair_list[1].vlabel)? How is it going to be sorted? –  WonKook Jan 4 '13 at 1:08
    
@user1643168 It compares it however you implement it. You decide that. –  Yuushi Jan 4 '13 at 1:09
    
What if I don't decide which field to compare with? Is there any 'default mode'? –  WonKook Jan 4 '13 at 1:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Does the sorting work like comparing each property(vid and vlabel) or....?

It happens exactly how you want it to happen.

By default as people have mentioned, the < operator is used by various sort algorithms to arrange elements in ascending order of that operator. However for classes/structs there is no default way to compare them meaning you the programmer has to code it in.

That is what

bool operator < (const vpair& x, const vpair& y);

is. It is just a declaration to the definition of the function the programmer has provided to compare 2 vpair order. The programmer uses his rules to decide and ultimately returns true or false. This is used to sort.

So you can decide exactly how you want it to sort.

bool operator < (const vpair& x, const vpair& y)
{
     if(x.vid != y.vid)
        return x.vid<y.vid;

     return x.vlabel <y.vlabel;
}

This would sort by ascending order of ID, if they are equal, It then sorts by ascending order of vlabel.

share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate for your answer. Cheers~ –  WonKook Jan 4 '13 at 1:15
    
@user1643168 glad i can help! –  Karthik T Jan 4 '13 at 1:15

The standard approach:

class vpair
{
public:
    int vid;
    int vlabel;
};

bool operator < (vpair const& x, vpair const& y)
{
     return std::tie(x.vid, x.vlabel) < std::tie(y.vid, y.vlabel);
}

Of course, the operator can be a member:

class vpair
{
    int vid;
    int vlabel;
public:
    bool operator < (vpair const& y) const
    {
         return std::tie(vid, vlabel) < std::tie(y.vid, y.vlabel);
    }

};
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you sehe. So it compares both vid and vlabel at the same time? what if one is bigger and the other is smaller and how is it gna be sorted? –  WonKook Jan 4 '13 at 1:11
    
The first tuple element takes precedence. To reverse the precedence, use std::tie(vlabel, vid) –  sehe Jan 4 '13 at 1:14
    
Using std::tie will compare them lexicographically, that is, it compares the first elements (in this case vid), if they are equal, it will compare the second elements (in this case, vlabel). –  Yuushi Jan 4 '13 at 1:15

Sort, by default, compares with the operator<. You can implement this operator for your class like so:

public:
bool operator < (const vpair& other) const
{
     return (vid < other.vid); // Uses vid but this can be vlable or something else.
}

If you don't have an overload for the operator< with the class you're using, you can always pass in a comparison function as std::sort's third argument:

bool compare_func(vpair i,vpair j) { return (i.vid < j.vid); }
sort(vpair_list, vpair_list+j, compare_func);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much Gunther –  WonKook Jan 4 '13 at 1:09
    
+1 for showing a free function predicate –  sehe Jan 4 '13 at 1:15

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