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New to multi-threading and I have come across some questions and confusion. :)

public class NewThread implements Runnable {

    Thread  t;

    NewThread() {
        t = new Thread(this, "Demo Thread");
        System.out.println("Child Thread " + t);
        t.start();
    }

    @Override
    public void run() {

        try {
            for (int i = 5; i > 0; i--) {
                System.out.println("Child Thread: " + i);
                Thread.sleep(500);
            }
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            System.out.println("Child Interrupted.");
        }

        System.out.println("Exiting Child Thread.");
    }

}

class ThreadDemo {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        NewThread t = new NewThread();

        try {
            for (int i = 5; i > 0; i--) {
                System.out.println("Main Thread: " + i);
                Thread.sleep(1000);
            }
        } catch (InterruptedException e) {
            // TODO: handle exception
            System.out.println("Main Thread Interrupted.");
        }

        System.out.println("Main Thread Exiting.");
    }

}

Excepted Output

enter image description here

My Output

enter image description here

Why is my console output different from the expected output? Thank You.

share|improve this question
    
are you sure that you have NewThread t = new NewThread(); in main? –  Prince John Wesley Jan 4 '13 at 1:57
    
Yeah, looks like it. –  AppSensei Jan 4 '13 at 1:59
    
The src looks fine for me. And am able to execute your source and am getting the proper output. Are you sure the src posted here is the same as the one you are testing? –  Jayamohan Jan 4 '13 at 2:00
    
Same with @Jayamohan –  user948620 Jan 4 '13 at 2:01
1  
Running fine for me, as well (with expected output). –  Ryan Jan 4 '13 at 2:04

4 Answers 4

The variable t in the NewThread class is not a NewThread type, so it never executes the child thread loop. You are never calling start() on a NewThread object, so it makes sense that you don't see any output from its execution.

The System object is static, and is shared by all the threads executing on this VM.

share|improve this answer
1  
The start() method is being called in constructor of NewThread class. Have you checked that? –  Jayamohan Jan 4 '13 at 1:55
    
Can you write it as code? –  AppSensei Jan 4 '13 at 1:58
    
I'm going to have to go back on this, after actually executing your code, I get your "Expected Output" –  Will C. Jan 4 '13 at 2:03

I would think the problem is that the constructor of your NewThread class is not being called. The weird part about your constructor

  NewThread() {
        <STUFF>
    }

is that is doen't have an access modifier, i.e. it is missing the public keyword. That makes the constructor package-private. If your ThreadDemo class is in a different package it will not be able to see the constructor, and the constructor will subsequently not be executed when you call

 NewThread t = new NewThread();

I therefore think you should just add the public keyword to your constructor and all is good. Alternatively put NewThread and ThreadDemo class in the same package.

share|improve this answer
    
@Appsherif Can you please check if this is correct and if so accept the answer? –  MarcFasel Jan 7 '13 at 8:07

The code, you're posted is fine! I got your expected output!

I suspect that you are started other code where you are overriding your variable "t" with the other variable "t" from your main. perhaps you declared a part of your code as static.

share|improve this answer
class ThreadDemo {

public static void main(String[] args) {

    NewThread t = new NewThread();

    try {
        for (int i = 5; i > 0; i--) {
            System.out.println("Main Thread: " + i);
            Thread.sleep(1000);
            t.run(); //// forgot here
        }
    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        // TODO: handle exception
        System.out.println("Main Thread Interrupted.");
    }

    System.out.println("Main Thread Exiting.");
}

}

add t.run();

share|improve this answer
1  
What's the point of thread If I call t.run() from main() method manually? –  user948620 Jan 4 '13 at 2:01
    
@user1947279 Not only will your t.run() call run on the main thread, it will also run on each iteration of the for-loop –  Ryan Jan 4 '13 at 2:14

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