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I have been trying to send a pointer to a pointer (we can call it an array of strings, or an array of an array of chars even) to a function, by reference, because I need it to be updated. I don't want to have the function returning the pointer to a pointer (that one I got working) because I want the return to be the size of the array.

This is a working function I created for testing purposes, which returns the pointer to a pointer, and the calling method:

#include <stdio.h>

char **populate_items() {
        char **items;
        int i;
        items = (char **) malloc(sizeof(char*) * 3);
        for (i=0; i<3; i++)
                *(items+i) = (char *) malloc(sizeof(char) * 10);
        items[0] = "1234567890";
        items[1] = "2345678901";
        items[2] = "3456789012";
        return items;
}

int main(int argv, char *argc) {
        char **items;
        int i;
        items = populate_items();
        for(i=0; i<3; i++)
                printf("%s\n", items[i]);
        return 0;
}

This is what I THINK the function and the call to the function that gets the pointer to a pointer as reference should look like, but I get a segmentation fault when trying to print items[1] or items[2]

#include <stdio.h>

populate_items(char ***items) {
        int i;
        *items = (char **) malloc(sizeof(char*) * 3);
        for (i=0; i<3; i++)
                *(items+i) = (char *) malloc(sizeof(char) * 10);
        *items[0] = "1234567890";
        *items[1] = "2345678901";
        *items[2] = "3456789012";
}

int main(int argv, char *argc) {
        char **items;
        int i;
        populate_items(&items);
        for(i=0; i<3; i++)
                printf("%s\n", items[i]);
        return 0;
}

In the abstraction that I created in my head, the function should be fine, but off course it's not given that I'm getting a segmentation fault. I already managed to understand how a pointer to a pointer works just fine, but I think I'm having trouble putting my head over how the pointer to a pointer to a pointer concept translates into code.

So what am I missing?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You forgot a dereference and got the precedence of * vs. [] wrong:

populate_items(char ***items) {
        int i;
        *items = (char **) malloc(sizeof(char*) * 3);
        for (i=0; i<3; i++)
                *(*items+i) = (char *) malloc(sizeof(char) * 10);
        (*items)[0] = "1234567890";
        (*items)[1] = "2345678901";
        (*items)[2] = "3456789012";
}

Note, however, that the assignments

(*items)[0] = "1234567890";

etc. lose the only handle to the just allocated memory.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Line 7 (the second malloc) has an error, but I don't need that malloc anyway, so I just took the whole for loop out. Again, thank you very much, I'll look out for precedences in the future. –  beder Jan 4 '13 at 2:02
    
Yeah, I forgot a * there too. It's much easier if you use []. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 4 '13 at 2:02
    
"Note, however, that the assignments...etc. lose the only handle to the just allocated memory." ... but this is solved if I remove the for loop with the second malloc, correct? –  beder Jan 4 '13 at 2:09
    
Yes, if you don't malloc these, there's no memory to be leaked. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 4 '13 at 2:13
1  
@nagaradderKantesh items is the address of a char** in the caller, so *items already has a memory location. The first malloc stores the address of a block large enough for three char* there, (*items)[i] for i = 0, 1, 2. Then in the loop, each of these is assigned the address of a block large enough for 10 chars, that's the memory corresponding to ***items. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 4 '13 at 10:23

you can use as below

 #include "stdafx.h"
 #include <stdlib.h>
 #include <stdio.h>


 char*** populate_items(char ***items) 
 {
      int i;
      items = (char ***) malloc(sizeof(char*) * 3);
      for (i=0; i<3; i++)
            *(items + i) = (char **) malloc(sizeof(char) * 10);
      **(items + 0) = "1234567890";
      **(items + 1) = "2345678901";
      **(items + 2) = "3456789012";
      return items;
 }

 int main(int argv, char *argc) 
 {
      char **items;
      int i;
      char *** res = populate_items(&items);
      for(i=0; i<3; i++)
            printf("%s\n", **(res + i));
      return 0;
 }
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