Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In some certain scenario it appeared to be useful for me to have a short-spoken, readable way to get null instead of the KeyNotFoundException while accessing dictionary value by key, when there is no such key in the dictionary.

The first thing that came into my mind was an extension method:

public static U GetValueByKeyOrNull<T, U>(this Dictionary<T, U> dict, T key)
        where U : class //it's acceptable for me to have this constraint
{
    if (dict.ContainsKey(key))
        return dict[key];
    else 
        //it could be default(U) to use without U class constraint
        //however, I didn't need this.
        return null; 
}

But it's not very short-spoken actually, when you write something like this:

string.Format("{0}:{1};{2}:{3}",                                                 
              dict.GetValueByKeyOrNull("key1"),
              dict.GetValueByKeyOrNull("key2"),
              dict.GetValueByKeyOrNull("key3"),
              dict.GetValueByKeyOrNull("key4"));

I'd say, it would be much better to havesomething close to base syntax: dict["key4"].

Then I came up with an idea to have a class with a private dictionary field, which exposed the functionality I need:

public class MyDictionary<T, U> //here I may add any of interfaces, implemented
                                //by dictionary itself to get an opportunity to,
                                //say, use foreach, etc. and implement them
                                // using the dictionary field.
        where U : class
{
    private Dictionary<T, U> dict;

    public MyDictionary()
    {
        dict = new Dictionary<T, U>();
    }

    public U this[T key]
    {
        get
        {
            if (dict.ContainsKey(key))
                return dict[key];
            else
                return null;
        }
        set
        {
            dict[key] = value;
        }
    }
}

But it seems a little overhead to get the slight change in the basic behaviour.

One more workaround could be to define a Func in the current context like this:

Func<string, string> GetDictValueByKeyOrNull = (key) =>
{
    if (dict.ContainsKey(key))
        return dict[key];
    else
        return null;
};

so it could be utilized like GetDictValueByKeyOrNull("key1").

Could you, please, give me any more suggestions or help to choose a better one?

share|improve this question
    
This isn't much shorter, but assuming the value's nullable, a Lookup<TKey, TElement> won't throw an exception - lookup[key].FirstOrDefault(). –  Simon MᶜKenzie Jan 4 '13 at 3:17
    
@SimonMcKenzie thanks, I'll think of it –  horgh Jan 4 '13 at 3:19
    
related: stackoverflow.com/questions/538729/… –  nawfal Apr 6 '13 at 8:11
    
Maybe this is new, but why don't we just use dict.TryGetValue? msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb347013(v=vs.110).aspx –  Jess Jul 1 at 19:45
    
@Jess it's not as short-spoken as I wanted –  horgh Jul 1 at 23:34
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In the end I came up with a variant using a deriving from dictionary class with explicit interface implementation:

public interface INullValueDictionary<T, U>
    where U : class
{
    U this[T key] { get; }
}

public class NullValueDictionary<T, U> : Dictionary<T, U>, INullValueDictionary<T, U>
    where U : class
{
    U INullValueDictionary<T, U>.this[T key]
    {
        get
        {
            U val;
            dict.TryGet(key, out val);
            return val;
        }
    }
}

So it exposes the functionality I need the following way:

//create some dictionary
NullValueDictionary<int, string> dict = new NullValueDictionary<int, string>
{
    {1,"one"}
};
//have a reference to the interface
INullValueDictionary<int, string> idict = dict;

try
{
    //this throws an exception, as the base class implementation is utilized
    Console.WriteLine(dict[2] ?? "null");
}
catch { }
//this prints null, as the explicit interface implementation 
//in the derived class is used
Console.WriteLine(idict[2] ?? "null");
share|improve this answer
    
Nice, I didn't think of that approach, +1. –  Eve Jan 16 '13 at 12:51
add comment

You can't get the syntax you want with an extension method, and as others have said overriding a method/operator to change its behavior is generally not a great idea. I think the best you can do is shorten the name you use.

That's if you need to keep to the IDictionary interface. If you aren't interfacing with any code that expects an IDictionary, then you are free to define your own interface and having the [] operator work differently isn't a problem.

Whatever you end up calling the function, you'll want to implement it like:

public static U Get<T, U>(this Dictionary<T, U> dict, T key)
    where U : class
{
    T val;
    dict.TryGet(key, out val);
    return val;
}

It just does one lookup, compared with 2 for your implementations.

share|improve this answer
    
This does not actually answer the question. However thanks for this info –  horgh Jan 5 '13 at 4:57
add comment

I premise by saying that I would not use this. The new keyword, while useful in this case, can create bugs which are really hard to find. Other than that, you can try this class.

class MyDictionary<TKey, TValue> : Dictionary<TKey, TValue>
{
    public new TValue this[TKey key]
    {
        get
        {
            TValue value;
            return TryGetValue(key, out value) ? value : default(TValue);
        }
        set { base[key] = value; }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this violates Liskov Substitution Principle and bugs created by this are really nasty. –  Honza Brestan Jan 4 '13 at 3:30
    
I wouln't use this either))) Anyway, thanks –  horgh Jan 4 '13 at 3:48
add comment

Worth pointing out that the HybridDictionary does this by default. You lose the generic typeing, but get the null-if-not-found functionality.

And (at least theoretically) you get performance benefits at low numbers of values, I think.

share|improve this answer
    
This is worth a comment only –  horgh Nov 17 '13 at 23:44
    
If is a String, String dict then StringDictionary won't loose the typeing. –  regisbsb Mar 5 at 17:20
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.