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This:

hilarious = False
joke_evaluation = "Isn't that joke so funny?! %r"

print joke_evaluation % hilarious

and this:

w = "This is the left side of..." e = "a string with a right side."

print w + e

Seem to be doing the same thing. Why can't I change the code to read:

print joke_evaluation + hilarious

Why doesn't this work?

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1  
That's because you can only concatenate a string to another string, while False is a bool type here. I'd prefer format() over % based string formatting. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jan 4 '13 at 3:45
    
Ok. I'm still way new so I'll keep that in mind. –  THeBAckwardss Jan 4 '13 at 20:13

3 Answers 3

%r calls repr(), which represents False (bool) as "False" (string).

+ can only be used to concatenate a string with other strings (Otherwise you get a TypeError: cannot concatenate 'str' and 'bool' objects)

You can convert False to a string before you concatenate it:

>>> print "Isn't that joke so funny?!" + str(False)

You could also try new string formatting:

>>> print "Isn't that joke so funny?! {!r}".format(False)
Isn't that joke so funny?! False
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This is a type conversion issue. When you are trying to concatenate to a string in Python, you may only concatenate other strings. You are attempting to concatenate a Boolean value to a string, which is not a supported operation.

You could do

print w + str(e) 

and that would be functional.

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1  
in his particular case %r will make it repr(e), "%r" % "a" will result in "'a'". –  yiding Jan 4 '13 at 3:45

This is what was confusing me:

hilarious = False
joke_evaluation = "Isn't that joke so funny?! %r"

print joke_evaluation % hilarious

I would prefer it to look like this:

hilarious = False
joke_evaluation = "Isn't that joke so funny?! %r" % hilarious

print joke_evaluation 

I guess it just looked funky to my eyes.

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