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I'm trying to initialize a variable in javascript (specifically, I want to use a remote template with the jQuery template plugin) and then have multiple asynchronous callbacks wait for it to be initialized before proceeding. What I really want is to be able to link to the remote template via a <script type="text/x-jquery-tmpl" src="/my/remote_template"> tag, but barring that I could get away with the javascript equivalent of a pthread_once.

Ideally, the api would look something like:

$.once(function_to_be_called_once, function_to_be_called_after_first) 

And used like:

var remote_template = "";

function init_remote_template() {
    remote_template = $.get( {
        url: "/my/remote/template",
        async: false
    });
}

$.once(init_remote_template, function () {
     // Add initial things using remote template.
});

And then later, elsewhere:

$.get({
    url: "/something/that/requires/an/asynchronous/callback",
    success: function () {
        $.once(init_remote_template, function () {
              // Do something using remote template.
        }
    }
});

Does such a thing exist?

share|improve this question
1  
Since Javascript is not multi-threaded, you don't need this. Just use a global variable to track whether the initialization routine has been run. You don't have to worry about mutual exclusion, because a function cannot be interrupted. –  Barmar Jan 4 '13 at 6:41
    
@Barmar - how do I block until the global variable has been set then? –  Alex Reece Jan 4 '13 at 6:46
    
Never mind, now I see that your init function uses AJAX. The asynchrony makes it like multi-threading. There's probably something you can do with jQuery delayed functions, but I'm not sure I can figure it out. –  Barmar Jan 4 '13 at 6:52
    
@AlexReece, I think you will have to explain what it is you want of .once(), for those of us who don't understand pthread_once. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Jan 4 '13 at 6:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Looks like jQuery's promises can help you out here:

var templatePromise = $.get({
    url: "/my/remote/template"
});

templatePromise.done(function(template) {
     // Add initial things using remote template.
});

and elsewhere you can do:

$.get({
    url: "/something/that/requires/an/asynchronous/callback",
    success: function () {
        templatePromise.done(function(template) {
              // Do more things using remote template.
        });
    }
});

Usually $.get (and $.ajax, etc) are used with success: and error: callbacks in the initial invocation, but they also return a promise object that acts just like a $.Deferred, documented here: http://api.jquery.com/category/deferred-object/ which allows you to do what you're asking. For error handling, you can use templatePromise.fail(...) or simply add error: ... to the initial $.get.

In general it's best to avoid synchronous AJAX calls because most browsers' interfaces will block while the HTTP request is being processed.

share|improve this answer
    
Great, thats just what I needed. –  Alex Reece Jan 5 '13 at 0:39

If I understand correctly, jQuery will do what you want of it by way of Deferreds/promises.

You can even generalise the remote template fetcher by

  • using a js plain object in which to cache any number of templates
  • renaming the function and passing a url to it, get_remote_template(url)

js :

var template_cache = {};//generalised template cache

//generalised template fetcher
function get_remote_template(url) {
    var dfrd = $.Deferred();
    if(!template_cache[url]) {
        $.get(url).done(function(tpl) {
            template_cache[url] = tpl; //we use the url as a key.
            dfrd.resolve(tpl);
        });
    }
    else {
        dfrd.resolve(template_cache[url]);
    }
    return dfrd.promise();
}

Then :

var url1 = "/my/remote/template"; //the url of a particular template

get_remote_template(url1).done(function(tpl) {
    // Add initial things using tpl.
});

And, earlier or later :

$.get({
    url: "/something/that/requires/an/asynchronous/callback",
    success: function(data) {
        init_remote_template(url1).done(function (tpl) {
            // Do something using tpl (and data).
        });
    }
});

Note how get_remote_template() returns a promise. If the requested template is already cached, the promise is returned ready-resolved. If the template is not yet in cache (ie. it needs to be downloaded from the server), then the promise will be resolved some short time later. Either way, the fact that a promise is returned allows a .done() command to be chained, and for the appropriate template to be accessed and used.

EDIT

Taking @BenAlpert's points on board, this version caches the promise associated with a tpl rather than the tpl itself.

var template_cache = {};//generalised cache of promises associated with templates.

//generalised template fetcher
function get_remote_template(url) {
    if(!template_cache[url]) {
        template_cache[url] = $.get(url);
    }
    return template_cache[url];//this is a promise
}

This version of get_remote_template() would be used in the same way as above.

share|improve this answer
    
Instead of caching the result of the $.get, you could store the promises in the object directly, which would make the code for get_remote_template a bit simpler. –  Ben Alpert Jan 4 '13 at 7:38
    
@BenAlpert, I think you're right, though I guess storing the promise would be less efficient of memory given that both the promise (explicitly) and the template (implicitly) would need to be stored. That said, the overhead of a promise is not great. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Jan 4 '13 at 7:42
    
Yeah, I was assuming that the jqXHR storage overhead isn't noticeable, which may or may not be the case. –  Ben Alpert Jan 4 '13 at 7:46
    
On second thoughts, I rather like your idea. There's actually an advantage in storing the promise - namely in the case that a second request for the same tpl was made, before the first was satisfied, your schema would allow both first and second .done() handlers to access the same promise - hence no double download. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Jan 4 '13 at 7:50
    
Your code could be made a bit simpler still -- as I mentioned in my answer, $.get returns a promise so you don't need to make one yourself. –  Ben Alpert Jan 4 '13 at 8:15

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