Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Using Java Graphics, I tried to draw a simple rectangle.

As Applet it runs well but when I use it to show on a JFrame, the rectangle is coming but with some unusual background

Here is coding:

package graphicsex;

import java.awt.Graphics;

public class Graphics2 extends javax.swing.JFrame {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Graphics2 inst = new Graphics2();
        inst.setVisible(true);
    }

    public Graphics2() {
        super();
        initGUI();
    }

    private void initGUI() {
        try {
            setDefaultCloseOperation(WindowConstants.DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE);
            pack();
            setSize(400, 300);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public void paint(Graphics g) {
        g.drawRect(10, 20, 30, 40);
    }
}

Then I tried to use JTextArea using these two classes but in this case the rectangle is not displaying at all.

GraphicsEx1.java:

package graphicsex;

import javax.swing.JTextArea;
import java.awt.Graphics;

public class GraphicsEx1 extends javax.swing.JFrame {

    private JTextArea jTextArea1;

    {
        //Set Look & Feel
        try {
            javax.swing.UIManager.setLookAndFeel("com.sun.java.swing.plaf.windows.WindowsLookAndFeel");
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        GraphicsEx1 inst = new GraphicsEx1();
        inst.setVisible(true);
    }

    public GraphicsEx1() {
        super();
        initGUI();
    }

    private void initGUI() {
        try {
            setDefaultCloseOperation(WindowConstants.DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE);
            getContentPane().setLayout(null);
            {
                jTextArea1 = new JTextArea();
                getContentPane().add(jTextArea1);
                jTextArea1.setBounds(7, 7, 371, 245);
                jTextArea1.setEnabled(false);
            }
            pack();
            setSize(400, 300);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        postInitGUI();
    }

    public void postInitGUI() {
        DisplayItems dp = new DisplayItems();
        jTextArea1 = dp;
        dp.setVisible(true);
        this.add(jTextArea1);
    }
}

And DisplayItems.java:

package graphicsex;

import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.Graphics;

public class DisplayItems extends javax.swing.JTextArea {

    public DisplayItems() {
        super();
        initGUI();
    }

    private void initGUI() {
        try {
            setPreferredSize(new Dimension(400, 300));
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public void paint(Graphics g) {
        g.drawRect(10, 20, 50, 100);
        g.drawString("Kalai", 90, 150);
    }
}

Can any one help me display graphics components on any swing containers like JFrame,JPanelorJTextarea` etc.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

It is inadvisable to override the paint method of a top level container...

JFrame contains a number of important layers onto which many other components are placed, buy doing this...

public void paint(Graphics g){
    g.drawRect(10,20,30,40);
}

You've successfully stopped any of the child components from begin painted, or in fact, anything other then your rectangle.

enter image description here

(The secret life of a top level swing container - Picture taken from How to use Root Panes)

While some might suggest simple adding a call to super.paint(g), I would not recommend it.

Better to use something like the JFrame's glass pane...This will allow you to paint over the components that reside within the frame. If you need to paint under the components, replace the JFrame's content pane instead.

You may find...

Of use...

Update

I think I'm beginning to see you problem with trying to perform custom painting on a text area.

The problem is, paintComponent paints the background AND the text in one foul swoop, meaning that any painting you do before calling super.paintComponent will be rendered over, but any painting done over it will paint over the text.

You could set the text area to be non-opaque and paint the background yourself...

enter image description here

public class CustomTextArea extends JTextArea {

    public CustomTextArea() {
        setOpaque(false);
    }

    @Override
    public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
        return new Dimension(200, 200);
    }

    @Override
    protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
        g.setColor(getBackground());
        g.fillRect(0, 0, getWidth(), getHeight());
        g.setColor(Color.RED);
        g.fillRect(0, 0, 100, 100);
        super.paintComponent(g);
    }

}

The problem is though, it's easy for people to rest the opaque level and destroy your work. Sure you could override the setOpaque or getOpaque, but how do you known when the user actually wants to set the component transparent, so you can stop fill the back ground?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your information, but I prefer to use the second case that is calling jtextarea from main class and on jtxtarea the rectangle to be drawn. Can you tell something about this case. –  Mitu_Chennai Jan 4 '13 at 7:04
    
@Mitu_Chennai Can you highlight what it is you are trying to achieve... –  MadProgrammer Jan 4 '13 at 8:04
    
You can see in method 'postInitGUI()' of class 'GraphicsEx1', its text area 'jTextArea1' is referred to class 'DisplayItems' which extends to JTextArea. I 've done this bcoz I thought I can easily draw rectangle on jtextarea –  Mitu_Chennai Jan 4 '13 at 12:40
    
The problem is, I can think of three ways to achieve what you want...directly via paintComponent, the glass pane or JLayer, each has it's merits and pitfalls depending on what you want to achieve... –  MadProgrammer Jan 6 '13 at 7:54
    
Thanks MadProgrammer for your info, but still I think there is another way,but it is correct or not I dont know. I tried a lot and finnaly I use a jpanel.Please check it out and reply me; –  Mitu_Chennai Jan 6 '13 at 18:24

* Using jPanel *

using jpanel, the graphics elements can be drawn;

import java.awt.Graphics;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.JScrollPane;
import javax.swing.JTextArea;
import javax.swing.WindowConstants;

public class GraphicsEx1 extends javax.swing.JFrame {
private JScrollPane jsp1;
private JTextArea jta1;
private JPanel jpnl1;

{
//Set Look & Feel
try {
javax.swing.UIManager.setLookAndFeel("com.sun.java.swing.plaf.windows.WindowsClassicLookAndFeel");
} catch(Exception e) {e.printStackTrace();}
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
GraphicsEx1 inst = new GraphicsEx1();
inst.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
inst.setVisible(true);
}

public GraphicsEx1() {
super();
initGUI();
postInitGUI();
}

private void initGUI() {
try {
setDefaultCloseOperation(WindowConstants.DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE);
getContentPane().setLayout(null);
{
jsp1 = new JScrollPane();
getContentPane().add(jsp1);
jsp1.setBounds(10, 32, 372, 223);
{
jpnl1 = new JPanel();    //<----------------
jsp1.setViewportView(jpnl1);    //<----------------
jpnl1.setBackground(new java.awt.Color(255,255,255));
jpnl1.setLayout(null);
//jpnl1.setPreferredSize(new java.awt.Dimension(359, 327));
}
}
pack();
setSize(400, 300);
} catch (Exception e) {e.printStackTrace();}
}

public void postInitGUI(){
frmGrpView gp=new frmGrpView();
jta1=new JTextArea();
jta1=gp;
jta1.setBounds(0,0, 336, 197);
jta1.setVisible(true);
//jpnl1.setBounds(0, 0, 336, 197);
jpnl1.add(jta1);    //<----------------
jpnl1.revalidate();
jsp1.revalidate();
}
}
//----------------------- Second Class --------------------------
class frmGrpView extends JTextArea{
public frmGrpView() {
super();
setEditable(false);
}
public void paint(Graphics g){
super.paint(g);
g.drawRect(10, 10, 100, 100);
}
}
share|improve this answer
1  
1. Overriding paint is not recommeded, as you remove any double buffering support that Swing components provide and it's generally to high in the paint chain. 2. This will draw a rectangle OVER the text - which might be what the OP is after, but it's worth pointing out ;) –  MadProgrammer Jan 6 '13 at 20:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.