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I have a working exe for a particular program which was built a month ago. I accidentally deleted the exe in the development environment so I compiled a new exe. However, I have a copy of the working exe in uat environment and its checksum is different from the new exe.

The 2 exe have same size:

----------+ 1 raymond1 Domain Users 623616 Jan 3 16:47 A.EXE;24

----------+ 1 raymond1 Domain Users 623616 Jan 4 11:11 A.EXE;25

But they got different checksums:

$ sha1sum "A.EXE;24"
cb87ec4b746677903969ba61361a60c14461b5e0 *RIIB.EXE;24
$ sha1sum "A.EXE;25"
09453f40e53e280abbb98bd0013f1ddf312706b8 *RIIB.EXE;25

So I wonder if there is any problem with the way I generated the new exe maybe I forget to compile some program it depends on.

Anyway, I compiled another exe with the exact same way I did for version 25. It still got the same size with the other two exe. I just linked it again. But version 26 got different checksum too.

$ sha1sum "RIIB.EXE;26"
e2378544a91db49927738fd0135181b9daf125be *RIIB.EXE;26

So I wonder if I could find out what is the different between them.

P.S. The exe was generated in OpenVms, I ftp it to my machine for the checksum ( CYGWIN in WIN 7 ).

EDIT:

I followed the advices in the comments and do a binary diff.

here is the result:

$ xxd "A.EXE;24" > b24.hex
$ xxd "A.EXE;25" > b25.hex
$ xxd "A.EXE;26" > b26.hex

$ diff b24.hex b25.hex
34849,34850c34849,34850
< 0088200: 1900 0060 0000 0000 6ff8 42de 9b2c 0100  ...`....o.B..,..
< 0088210: 3500 0060 0000 0000 8c6f f842 de9b ac00  5..`.....o.B....
---
> 0088200: 1900 0060 0000 0000 62b3 87f4 cd2c 0100  ...`....b....,..
> 0088210: 3500 0060 0000 0000 0b62 b387 f4cd ac00  5..`.....b......
38862c38862
< 0097cd0: 4950 462f 564d 5300 8c6f f842 de9b ac00  IPF/VMS..o.B....
---
> 0097cd0: 4950 462f 564d 5300 0b62 b387 f4cd ac00  IPF/VMS..b......
38868c38868
< 0097d30: 0100 0000 0300 0000 8c6f f842 de9b ac00  .........o.B....
---
> 0097d30: 0100 0000 0300 0000 0b62 b387 f4cd ac00  .........b......
38872c38872
< 0097d70: 4950 462f 564d 5300 8c6f f842 de9b ac00  IPF/VMS..o.B....
---
> 0097d70: 4950 462f 564d 5300 0b62 b387 f4cd ac00  IPF/VMS..b......    

$ diff b25.hex b26.hex
34849,34850c34849,34850
< 0088200: 1900 0060 0000 0000 62b3 87f4 cd2c 0100  ...`....b....,..
< 0088210: 3500 0060 0000 0000 0b62 b387 f4cd ac00  5..`.....b......
---
> 0088200: 1900 0060 0000 0000 10a5 1c14 ce2c 0100  ...`.........,..
> 0088210: 3500 0060 0000 0000 e710 a51c 14ce ac00  5..`............
38862c38862
< 0097cd0: 4950 462f 564d 5300 0b62 b387 f4cd ac00  IPF/VMS..b......
---
> 0097cd0: 4950 462f 564d 5300 e710 a51c 14ce ac00  IPF/VMS.........
38868c38868
< 0097d30: 0100 0000 0300 0000 0b62 b387 f4cd ac00  .........b......
---
> 0097d30: 0100 0000 0300 0000 e710 a51c 14ce ac00  ................
38872c38872
< 0097d70: 4950 462f 564d 5300 0b62 b387 f4cd ac00  IPF/VMS..b......
---
> 0097d70: 4950 462f 564d 5300 e710 a51c 14ce ac00  IPF/VMS.........

They have the different in the same line. Maybe it is the timestamp causing problem?

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Agnius Vasiliauskas, Konstantin Dinev, Niranjan Kala, Sameer, this.lau_ Jan 4 '13 at 11:06

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
You could do a binary diff between v25 and v26 & see which bytes cause the hash change. Since you know the only difference is the time of compilation: superuser.com/questions/125376/… . If it's only the same bytes that differ with v24 you know it's just the timestamp that's changing the hash. –  therefromhere Jan 4 '13 at 7:08
1  
sha1sum "file" will be different even if you change single bit two .exe`. May be compiler insert something even if you have not changed files. Mitch Wheat Is correct its can't be answer 100%. But upto some extend its possible using disassemble. –  Grijesh Chauhan Jan 4 '13 at 7:11
1  
@lamwaiman1988 I guess the real question is, what do you care? make clean and be done with it. Your code is checked into a versioning system, right? Well then, any build from the same revision will be functionally identical. Don't worry about the SHA1. –  Jonathon Reinhart Jan 4 '13 at 7:19
1  
It looks to me like it's the same byte locations that change between v24/v25 and v25/v26, so yes I'd say it's a reasonable assumption that that they're the same code. –  therefromhere Jan 4 '13 at 7:38
2  
diff <(xxd file1.bin) <(xxd file2.bin) :-) –  Jonathon Reinhart Jan 4 '13 at 7:39

1 Answer 1

As far as the program functionality is concerned, there is no difference between the 2 versions given you compiled exactly the same code with exactly the same parameters (unless you have some extremely weird compiler bug). Note, you may also have some dependency on environmental settings in your code, such as date or time compiler-generated constants - which naturally can be different for each compilation.

The signature is and should be different because there are additional factors that affect the actual generated binary, such as time of compilation, environment, compiler meta-data or state of the weather during compilation. In fact, if the signature was the same, that would mean that sha1 is worthless.

Edit:

Compiler-generated constants such as __LINE__ (e.g., a pre-build script might inject some #defines into code for code-analysis tools), __DATE__ and __TIME__ may change from one compilation to another.

The compiler may choose not to recompile some files if it considers the .obj to be up to date (and that's not always correct, especially if precompiled headers are used, but not only - resulting in invalid .exe). Moreover, the linker may have internal considerations regarding the order of linkage due to speed or optimization or any other reason.

share|improve this answer
    
downvoter, care to comment? –  icepack Jan 4 '13 at 7:17
    
-1 Sorry, there is just a bit too much nonsense in this. I think if you zero out the timestamp and checksum from the PE headers, I can't think of any reason the SHA1 hashes couldn't be the same. The state of the weather (yes, I know it was a pun), or any other pseudo-random factors don't enter into it. "environment, compiler meta-data" also don't really make sense. –  Jonathon Reinhart Jan 4 '13 at 7:18
    
If a file.o is missing, there's a chance of completely different implementation of a function taking place without changing linked file-size. (dynamic linking) –  Aki Suihkonen Jan 4 '13 at 7:18
    
@AkiSuihkonen explain? First of all, these are .exes, there won't be any .o files. If you meant .obj files, you're also incorrect, because those will be statically linked into the executable. –  Jonathon Reinhart Jan 4 '13 at 7:21
    
@JonathonReinhart oh, really? Dependency on __LINE__ (as was mentioned in the comments) or __TIME__ will result in different code. Different order of linkage may result in different executable layout (and the OP mentioned deleting some .obj files) - haven't you ever encountered the need to rebuild the entire project? That's the reason –  icepack Jan 4 '13 at 7:23

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