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Here is the code:

public static void main(String args[]) throws Exception {
    String template = "The user has spent amount in a day";
    String pattern = "amount";
    String output = template.replaceAll(pattern, "$ 100");
    System.out.println(output);
}

and the output:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: Illegal group reference
        at java.util.regex.Matcher.appendReplacement(Matcher.java:713)
        at java.util.regex.Matcher.replaceAll(Matcher.java:813)
        at java.lang.String.replaceAll(String.java:2190)
        at demo.BugDemo.main(BugDemo.java:16)
Java Result: 1

at here

I use replaceAll and replaceFirst methods but I read data from a file and should I escape all $ symbols at file data - this seems like an unnecessary process? Is there any other class or library to handle this situation?

PS 1: Do I miss something, what is the problem with having a special symbol at replacement text (not at regex)?

PS 2: I don't want to check every character to escape, that's why I am asking this question.

PS 3: I use Java 6

share|improve this question
    
Try \\\$; $ I believe is a special character. –  Emrakul Jan 4 '13 at 7:18
    
@Telthien: Not in terms of the Java language. It is in terms of regular expressions. Is that what you meant? (Your comment isn't clear.) –  Jon Skeet Jan 4 '13 at 7:20
    
Oh, yeah, whoops. Changed the escape to \\\$ –  Emrakul Jan 4 '13 at 7:22
    
@Telthien: Why triple backslash though? It doesn't require escaping from Java's perspective. –  Jon Skeet Jan 4 '13 at 7:23
1  
@Telthien That question asks about when pattern involves special character, totally different from my question. I have special character at my text. –  kamaci Jan 4 '13 at 7:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

String.replaceAll takes a regular expression matching pattern as its first parameter, and a regular expression replacement pattern as its second parameter - and $ has a specific meaning in regular expressions (in both matching patterns and replacement patterns, although in different senses).

Just use String.replace instead, and I suspect all your problems will go away. You should only use replaceAll when you genuinely want to match/replace via a regular expression - which I don't think you do in this case.

EDIT: As to your question:

PS 1: Do I miss something, what is the problem with having a special symbol at replacement text (not at regex)?

Again, the documentation for replaceAll makes this clear:

Note that backslashes (\) and dollar signs ($) in the replacement string may cause the results to be different than if it were being treated as a literal replacement string; see Matcher.replaceAll. Use Matcher.quoteReplacement(java.lang.String) to suppress the special meaning of these characters, if desired.

So if you want to treat the matching pattern as a regular expression, but not the replacement, then use Matcher.quoteReplacement.

share|improve this answer
    
I have edited my question. How about replaceFirst? –  kamaci Jan 4 '13 at 7:25
    
Well did you check the documentation for replaceFirst? Yes, that still uses regular expressions and replacement patterns. Why do you want to use replaceAll or replaceFirst? –  Jon Skeet Jan 4 '13 at 8:09

In a replacement string, $ is a special character: it is used to grab matched groups from the pattern you are replacing. You can read more about it here.

To fix this, you can quote the replacement string to remove all special meaning from $ characters:

import java.util.regex.Matcher;
// ...
String output = template.replaceAll(pattern, Matcher.quoteReplacement("$ 100"));
share|improve this answer
    
Why would you do that rather than just using an API which doesn't use regular expressions? –  Jon Skeet Jan 4 '13 at 7:20
    
@JonSkeet good point, if replaceAll is unnecessary your answer is better. –  Cory Kendall Jan 4 '13 at 7:21
    
@CoryKendall I have edited my question could you check it? –  kamaci Jan 4 '13 at 7:47
    
@kamaci the replacement text is not a regex, but it is still special. The $ character is special in replacement text. Read this link for more information: docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/… –  Cory Kendall Jan 4 '13 at 7:49
    
@CoryKendall Should I use Matcher.quoteReplacement for replaceFirst or is there any other way? –  kamaci Jan 4 '13 at 7:52

$ is used a symbol to specify the replacement group. You need to escape it:

String output = template.replaceAll(pattern, "\\$ 100");
share|improve this answer

Try this one

 String template = "The user has spent amount in a day";
 String pattern = "amount";
 String output = template.replaceAll(pattern, "\\$ 100");
 System.out.println(output);
share|improve this answer

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