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I am working on an asp.net application with MS SQL DB. I have the following secnario

A table with User Location Information

User ID, GEOGRAPHIC POINT, LOCATION TYPE

I want to do the following:

query above table for a specific user for example userid 1 I will get all his locations

now I want to query the same table again for each of the rows returned above taking the geographic point as parameter so that I can search for any other user within a specific distance. I know how to work with geographic point and get records within a specific distance. However I want your help in how can I loop through the records in first query and combine all resuts in one output.

What is the best apporach to this.. for example SQL query, SP, Cursors, or from ASP.net side processing. How can I acheive this? Appreciate all your help in advance.

*I will be querying the table for each location type for example if location type = A then distance should be 10 KM if B the 50 KM et

share|improve this question

A set based solution should always be the first thing you try to find when working with SQL. We don't do loops(*)

SELECT
    * --TODO - Select columns
FROM
    UserLocations ul1
        inner join
    UserLocations ul2
        on
            ul1.User != ul2.User and
            ul1.Point.StDistance(ul2.Point) < 10 --Whatever you distance criteria is
WHERE
    ul1.User = 1

(*) unless we've tried and failed to find a set based solution that performs adequately.


If you want a single result set for each location type, it would be something like:

SELECT
    * --TODO - Select columns
FROM
    UserLocations ul1
        inner join
    UserLocations ul2
        on
            ul1.User != ul2.User and
            ul1.Point.StDistance(ul2.Point) <
                CASE WHEN ul1.LocationType='A' THEN 10
                     WHEN ul1.LocationType='B' THEN 50
                END
WHERE
    ul1.User = @UserID --User parameter
ORDER BY
    ul1.LocationType --Guessing you might want each location types rows together

If you want to do each location separately (not sure why you would, but anyhow):

SELECT
    * --TODO - Select columns
FROM
    UserLocations ul1
        inner join
    UserLocations ul2
        on
            ul1.User != ul2.User and
            ul1.Point.StDistance(ul2.Point) <
                CASE WHEN ul1.LocationType='A' THEN 10
                     WHEN ul1.LocationType='B' THEN 50
                END
WHERE
    ul1.User = @UserID --User parameter
    AND ul1.LocationType = @Location --Location parameter
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the prompt reply. I didnt get the idea here. Can you please shed some light on what you have proposed. – user1866308 Jan 4 '13 at 7:44
    
I will be querying the table for each location type for example if location type = A then distance should be 10 KM if B the 50 KM etc. Can I achieve this using the suggested method – user1866308 Jan 4 '13 at 7:45
1  
@user1866308 - We're doing a join. That is, we're taking rows from one table (here, aliased as ul1) and attempting to find other rows (from ul2) which match them. In this case, the matching criteria I've given are that the rows in ul2 belong to a different user, and that the distance between the row from ul1 and the row from ul2 is less than some cutoff value. The WHERE clause filters ul1 to only contain rows belonging to user 1 (as per your Q), and in this case ul1 and ul2 are the same table. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 4 '13 at 7:48
    
@user1866308 - Yes, you just change the criteria in the ON clause for the join. ul1 refers to rows belonging to user 1. ul2 refers to the other rows that we're trying to locate. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 4 '13 at 7:49
1  
@user1866308 - if you're going to process all location types, I'd usually recommend doing them all in one query - I've added an example of that, but I'm now sorting the results so that all results relating to each location type come together. If, instead, you still want to do it as separate queries for each location type, that's the third query in my answer. – Damien_The_Unbeliever Jan 4 '13 at 7:56

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