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I am not able to understand this behavior. I have a class A,

class A
{
public:
int ch;
char *s;
A()
{}
A(char *st):ch(0)
{
    s = new char[10];
    strcpy(s,st);

}
A(const A& rhs):ch(rhs.ch)
{
    s = new char[strlen(rhs.s)+1];
    strcpy(s,rhs.s);
}
const A& operator=(const A& rhs)
{
    char *temp = new char[strlen(rhs.s)+1];
    strcpy(temp,rhs.s);
    delete[] s;
    s=temp;
    ch = rhs.ch;
    return *this;
}
~A()
{
    delete []s;
}
};

Till this point everything goes as expected I am able to test my copy constructor and assignment operator and they are working properly.

Now I created a child class B and I am getting heap corruption error. I am not able to understand, is this the problem related somewhere with class A destructor. ? Below is my class B,

class B:public A
{

public:
int a;
B():a(0){}
};
share|improve this question
3  
You probably never used the default constructor for A until it was implicitly used by B. The problem is the default constructor leaves s uninitialized, so it points to nowhere, and when then the destructor comes in and tries to delete [] it, you get a crash. –  jogojapan Jan 4 '13 at 8:05
    
Does the corruption happen when you call only the constructor? –  Mark Garcia Jan 4 '13 at 8:05
    
@Mark yeah means when I tried to access B class object –  JackSparrow Jan 4 '13 at 8:07
    
@jogojapan Yeah may be this is the case let me check again –  JackSparrow Jan 4 '13 at 8:09
1  
Your assignment operator is correct (though you should probably not get into the habit of calling delete until the objects state is finalized (non POD may throw when deleted)). But an easier way to write it is to use the Copy and Swap idiom. –  Loki Astari Jan 4 '13 at 8:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You default constructor for A does not initialise the member s (a pointer):

A()
{}

Hence when elements are constructed using this constructor, you get a crash when the destructor deletes the uninitialized element:

~A()
{
  delete []s;
}

Class B uses the default constructor for A, and therefore triggers this problem. Avoid it by properly initializing all members in the default constructor:

A() : ch(), s(0)
{ }
share|improve this answer
1  
yeah thanks this is where I was wrong ..silly me :( ...I was deleting uninitialized member..thanks.! –  JackSparrow Jan 4 '13 at 8:16

To solve your problem all you need to do is to replace:

char *s;

with

std::string s;

Just get rid of the manual memory management through char *, this is precisely the reason C++ provides you with std::string.

What might be the problem?

Your default constructor which does not take any arguments does no dynamic allocation.
If you created the class object through this constructor, Your destructor ends up deleteing a pointer which was not allocated with new and thus resulting in Undefined Behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah that's true but actually I am practicing with the copy constructor and assignment operator ! –  JackSparrow Jan 4 '13 at 8:08
    
@Himank: Are you practicing to write bad code? You should not! You should practice writing good code. –  Alok Save Jan 4 '13 at 8:09
    
Actually I was going through the topic why we need copy constructor and assignment operator..so I tried this example which involves a raw pointer member –  JackSparrow Jan 4 '13 at 8:18
    
else yeah I prefer string too .. :) –  JackSparrow Jan 4 '13 at 8:18

In the destructor, you delete[] s;, but in the default constructor, you haven't new[]ed s. In fact, you haven't even initialized s.

The default constructor of the base class is called when you instantiate the derived class because you have not initialized the base otherwise (: A(...)). Therefore, you have no idea what you're deleting, or even what you're going to have for breakfast tomorrow, because it's undefined behaviour.

To keep it consistent, new[] s in the default constructor. To save headache, I would suggest something like std::string instead of character pointers.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah right ..thanks .. :) –  JackSparrow Jan 4 '13 at 8:19

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