Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I want to bring the first occurrence of a date or in general a regular expression to the beginning of my text:

Example: "I went out on 1 sep 2012 and it was better than 15 jan 2012" and I want to get "1 sep 2012, I went out on and it was better than 15 jan 2012"

I was thinking about replacing "1 sep 2012" with ",1 sep 2012," and then cutting the string from "," but I don't know what to write instead of replace_with:

line = re.sub(r'\d+\s(?:jan|feb|mar|apr|may|jun|jul|aug|sep|oct|nov|dec)\s\d{4}', 'replace_with', line, 1)

any help?

share|improve this question
3  
What language are you using? –  Cerbrus Jan 4 '13 at 8:05
1  
Python, probably. –  Asad Jan 4 '13 at 8:08
    
You're not using enough capture groups... –  Jack Maney Jan 4 '13 at 8:09
    
I am trying to learn python! what does "enough capture groups" mean? I'll try to google "capture groups" myself! –  Mor Brb Jan 4 '13 at 8:11
    
Forget about Python for the moment. Please look through some regex tutorials. The first argument that you have in re.sub() above won't get you what you want. –  Jack Maney Jan 4 '13 at 8:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use capture groups:

>>> import re
>>> s = "I went out on 1 sep 2012 and it was better than 15 jan 2012"
>>> r = re.compile('(^.*)(1 sep 2012 )(.*$)')
>>> r.sub(r'\2\1\3',s)
'1 sep 2012 I went out on and it was better than 15 jan 2012'

Brackets capture parts of the string:

(^.*)          # Capture everything from the start of the string
(1 sep 2012 )  # Upto the part we are interested in (captured)
(.*$)          # Capture everything else

Then just reorder the capture groups in the substitution `\2\1\3' note: to reference the capture groups requires a raw string r'\2\1\3'. The second group in my example is just the literal string (1 sep 2012 ) but of course this can be any regexp such as the one you created (with an extra \s on the end):

(\d+\s(?:jan|feb|mar|apr|may|jun|jul|aug|sep|oct|nov|dec)\s\d{4}\s)

>>> r = re.compile(r'(^.*)(\d+\s(?:aug|sep|oct|nov)\s\d{4}\s)(.*$)')
>>> r.sub(r'\2\1\3',s)
'1 sep 2012 I went out on and it was better than 15 jan 2012'

From docs.python.org:

When an 'r' or 'R' prefix is present, a character following a backslash is included in the string without change.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.