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Below, I compare the results from an R-function with my own code. The algorithm simply consists of maximising a function of many parameters (here, 19). My code defines the function and uses nlm for optimisation. Fortunately, both return the same result. However, the R-function is amazingly quick. I therefore suspect I can do better than using nlm (or a similar optimisation routine in R). Any idea?


Here is some survival data that can be fitted with a Cox model. To do so, one needs to maximise the partial log-likelihood (3rd equation in the wikipedia link).

InR, this can be done with coxph() (part of the survival package):

> library(survival)
> fmla <- as.formula(paste("Surv(time, event) ~ ", 
+                          paste(names(data)[-(1:3)], collapse=" +")))
> mod <- coxph(formula=fmla, data=data)
> round(mod$coef, 3)
    x1     x2     x3     x4     x5     x6     x7     x8     x9    x10    x11    x12    x13    x14    x15 
-0.246 -0.760  0.089 -0.033 -0.138 -0.051 -0.484 -0.537 -0.620 -0.446 -0.204 -0.112 -0.089 -0.451  0.043 
   x16    x17    x18    x19 
 0.106 -0.015 -0.245 -0.653

This can be checked by explicitly writing the partial log-likelihood and by using some numerical optimisation routine. Here is some crude code which does this job.

The code has been edited based on the comments I received

> #------ minus partial log-lik ------
> Mpll <- function(beta, data) 
+   #!!!data must be ordered by increasing time!!! 
+   #--> data <- data[order(data$time), ]
+ {
+   #preparation
+   N <- nrow(data)  
+   linpred <- as.matrix(data[, -(1:3)]) %*% beta
+   
+   #pll
+   pll <- sum(sapply(X=which(data$event == 1), FUN=function(j) 
+     linpred[j] - log(sum(exp(linpred[j:N])))))
+   
+   #output
+   return(- pll)
+ }
> #-----------------------------------
> 
> data <- data[order(data$time), ]
> round(nlm(f=Mpll, p=rep(0, 19), data=data)$estimate, 3)
 [1] -0.246 -0.760  0.089 -0.033 -0.138 -0.051 -0.484 -0.537 -0.620 -0.446 -0.204 -0.112 -0.089 -0.451
[15]  0.043  0.106 -0.015 -0.245 -0.653

OK, it works... but it is much much slower!

Does anyone have an idea on what is done within coxph() to make it so fast?

share|improve this question
    
@Arun: I haven't tried Rprof()... but my code basically consists of one single line: the 'nlm' line... –  Marco Jan 4 '13 at 8:11
2  
Try typing "coxph" without any parentheses at the command line... enjoy. I'm guessing it's vectorizing a lot of what you've done. Try to break things down. How could all X[j, ] %*% beta be pre-calculated before loop? How could all the rows where event == 1 be extracted beforehand? –  John Jan 4 '13 at 8:48
    
@John: Thx for your comment. If I get it correctly, you think that I can significantly speed it up by re-writing the Mpll function more carefully. Right? –  Marco Jan 4 '13 at 8:52
2  
Keep this in mind, R generally executes individual calls slowly. If you need a loop make it as small as possible because each call in the loop hurts you. When your data isn't big using memory is much better than looping. For example, that if statement is easily disposed of in the loop. Just preselect the rows beforehand (but I think you have to be careful about j then... pre-create it as well). Now the loop is much shorter and doesn't ask if each time... for starters. I haven't examined it carefully but you might be able to get rid of the loop all together. –  John Jan 4 '13 at 9:09
    
Thanks @John, I will try this –  Marco Jan 4 '13 at 9:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is a vectorized version of your code.

Mpll2 <- function(beta, data) {
  X <- as.matrix(data[, -(1:3)])
  a <- X %*% beta
  b <- log(rev(cumsum(rev(exp(a)))))
  -sum((a - b)[data$event==1])
}

And here is a simple test of the run times.

data <- data[order(data$time), ] # No reason to order every time

# Yours
system.time(round(nlm(f=Mpll, p=rep(0, 19), data=data)$estimate, 3))
#    user  system elapsed 
#    2.77    0.01    2.79 

# Vectorized
system.time(round(nlm(f=Mpll2, p=rep(0, 19), data=data)$estimate, 3))
#    user  system elapsed 
#    0.28    0.00    0.28 

# Optimized C code
fmla <- as.formula(paste("Surv(time, event) ~ ", 
                          paste(names(data)[-(1:3)], collapse=" +")))
system.time(round(coxph(formula=fmla, data=data)$coef,3)) 
#    user  system elapsed 
#    0.02    0.00    0.03 

So, about an order of magnitude difference between each type. C is very fast, and you are never going to approach those speeds in R. But C is harder to write.

share|improve this answer
    
I both accept and upvote because I love it! Many thanks! –  Marco Jan 4 '13 at 19:08
    
By the way, I still think it is important to sort the data set beforehand. –  Marco Jan 4 '13 at 19:48
    
@Marco It is crucial that you sort the data, but you should do it only once, instead of every single time you run the function. –  nograpes Jan 5 '13 at 0:59
    
Ah ok, I did not understand your message. We agree then. That's why I sorted the data outside the function ;-) –  Marco Jan 5 '13 at 7:28

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