Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I wonder why named parameters don't work as I expect.

 def my_method(var1, var2 = 1, var3 = 10)
   puts var1, var2, var3
 end

my_method(999, var3 = 123)

The output

999
123
10

instead of (at least, as I guess should be):

999
1
123

So, what should I do to use named parameters?

P.S. When I use the hash, it's not what I'm looking for yet:

def my_method(var1, vars = {var2: 1, var3: 10} )
   puts var1, vars[:var2], vars[:var3]
 end

my_method(999, var3: 123)

999

123


my_method(999, var2: 111, var3: 123)

999
111
123



my_method(999)
999
1
10

So I have to override each value of vars or don't override them at all. Is there any more convenient way?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Ciro Santilli, Frederick Cheung Jul 9 at 9:35

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
What ruby version are you using? There are no named parameters in 1.9.3 and older. –  Sergio Tulentsev Jan 4 '13 at 8:33
    
It's 1.9.3...... –  Marius Kavansky Jan 4 '13 at 8:34
    
1.9 doesn't have named parameters, they're in 2.x –  Lee Jarvis Jan 4 '13 at 8:36
    
Yes, I know. But what does my_method(999, var3 = 123) mean? –  Marius Kavansky Jan 4 '13 at 8:37
    
It calls my_method with the arguments 99 and 123 and sets the local (to the caller) variable var3 to 123 –  Frederick Cheung Jan 4 '13 at 9:05

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In ruby my_method(999, var3 = 123) means, assign var3 the value 123 and pass it to my_method.

There is no concept of named parameters, however, you can use a hash as an argument to my_method such as:

def my_method(args = {})
   p "#{args[:a]}, #{args[:b]}, #{args[:c]}"
end

Then you can call it with:

my_method(b: 2, c: 3, a: 1)

which will print 1, 2, 3, because b: 2, c: 3, a: 1 is inferred to be a hash by ruby. You can explicitly indicate the hash as well with:

my_method({b: 2, c: 3, a: 1})
share|improve this answer
    
How do I set default values for args then? –  Marius Kavansky Jan 4 '13 at 8:41
    
One technique used is to give default values within the function (in your case my_method) as in: args[:a] = args[:a] || 3 for instance. –  Candide Jan 4 '13 at 8:44
1  
do you mean args[:a] ||= 3? –  Marius Kavansky Jan 4 '13 at 8:50
    
thanks. Is there any other technique? –  Marius Kavansky Jan 4 '13 at 8:53
    
You can mix an parameters, some could be hashes, others regular params. However, if you do that ambiguity may creep in, and you will need to explicitly use the curly brackets. Overloading is another option of course. –  Candide Jan 4 '13 at 8:57

As pointed out, Ruby does not have keyword arguments (yet, they coming in 2.0). To achieve what you are trying to do, an options hash is a very common Ruby idiom.

def my_method(var1, options = {})
  var2 = options.fetch(:var2, 1)
  var3 = options.fetch(:var3, 10)

  puts var1, var2, var3
end

my_method(999)
# => 999, 1, 10

my_method(999, var3: 123)
# => 999, 1, 123

my_method(999, var2: 111)
# => 999, 111, 10

my_method(999, var2: 111, var3: 123)
# => 999, 111, 123

my_method()
# => ArgumentError: wrong number of arguments (0 for 1)

Note that using options.fetch(:key, default) rather than options[:key] || default is frequently preferable because it allows you to explicitly specify falsy values (ie false and nil).

options = {x: nil, y: false}

x = options[:x] || 42      # sets x to 42
x = options.fetch(:x, 42)  # sets x to nil

y = options[:y] || 43      # sets y to 43
y = options.fetch(:y, 43)  # sets y to false

z = options[:z] || 44      # sets z to 44
z = options.fetch(:z, 44)  # sets z to 44

You can even pass a block to fetch which allows you to defer computation of the default value:

options.fetch(:x) { some_expensive_calculation }
# some_expensive_calculation is only called if necessary
share|improve this answer
    
I think you have a couple of typos in your third code block. (sets x to nil and sets y to false) –  doesterr Jan 4 '13 at 12:42
    
@doesterr I don't think so. Given options = {x: nil}, x = options.fetch(:x, 42) definitely sets x to nil. That's the point of using fetch. –  Andy H Jan 4 '13 at 21:19
    
oops, you're right of course. don't know what I was thinking.. –  doesterr Jan 5 '13 at 14:47

You can use this

  def my_method(options = {})
   puts options[:var1] || ''
   puts options[:var2] || ''
   puts options[:var3] || ''
  end

call using

my_method(var1:999, var3: 123)

or

my_method(var1:999)
share|improve this answer

You can also play with something like this:

def method(data)
    defaults = {var2: 1, var3: 10}
    (@var1, @var2, @var3) = defaults.merge(data).values_at(:var1, :var2, :var3)
    p @var1, @var2, @var3
end

method(var1: 999, var3: 123)
share|improve this answer

Ruby 2.0.0 is released, now you can use named parameters.

def my_method(var1, var2: 1, var3: 10)
   puts var1, var2, var3
end

my_method(999, var3: 123)

The result:

999
1
123

Or another example:

def foo(str: "foo", num: 100)
  [str, num]
end

p foo(str: 'buz', num: 1) #=> ['buz', 1]
p foo(str: 'bar') # => ['bar', 100]
p foo(num: 2) # => ["foo", 2]
p foo # => ['foo', 100]
p foo(bar: 'buz') # => ArgumentError
share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.