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I am not working on the Master branch. I am working on a different one newFeature , which is also published on github.

I know how to to close issues when working on the Master branch: Closes #XXX.

However this only works when I am working on the Master branch, if I switch over to the other branch or a different one and do a commit with Closes #XXX it does not close the issue.

My question is: Is it possible to do this and how do you do it?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

i'm pretty sure github issues are agnostic of branches.

are you talking about a local branch or a tracking branch? if your not specifically tracking the branch on github, the branch will not be pushed - thus github will not see your close #XXX command. here's some info on remote branches from the progit book http://git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Branching-Remote-Branches

UPDATE

i emailed this problem to the github support staff and they confirmed this is expected behavior. here's the response i got from them:

It is because of a recent change we made. Issues are only closed when the commits are merged to the default branch of your repository. I am sorry for the confusion.

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I am tracking this branch on github. I updated my question accordingly. –  bottleboot Jan 4 '13 at 17:02
    
agreed. i just setup a gh repo, made an issue, made a branch, refrenced the issue from a commit, and pushed it. in the gh commit history it makes the reference to the issue, but that reference was not made in the issue itself. i would submit this problem to github. –  xero Jan 4 '13 at 18:30
    
Ok thanks, I was just double checking to be sure. It could have been that it was possible but I was just not aware. –  bottleboot Jan 5 '13 at 0:22

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