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I would like to know when exactly an HttpSession would be expired (not the same as destroyed)?

I am trying to figure out if session.getLastAccessedTime() + (session.getMaxInactiveInterval() * 1000) will give me the exact time in milliseconds of session expiry each time a request comes with the same session id!

From the javadocs:

long getLastAccessedTime()

  Returns the last time the client sent a request associated with this session, as the number of milliseconds since midnight January 1, 1970 GMT, and marked by the time the container received the request.    

int getMaxInactiveInterval()

  Returns the maximum time interval, in seconds, that the servlet container will keep this session open between client accesses.  

Lets say we have the following:
Treq1 - the time the container received the 1st request (HttpSession.lastAccessedTime)
Tresp1 - the time the container sends the 1st response
Preq1 - the time period between Treq1 and Tresp1 (the time period that the server processes the 1st request
Treq2 - the time the container received the 2nd request (HttpSession.lastAccessedTime)
Preq1req2 - the time period between Treq1 and Treq2 (the time between requests entering the container)
Presp1req2 - the time period between Tresp1 and Treq2 (the time between the 1st response exiting the container and the 2nd request entering the container)

So now, when does the server calculate the session as expired? When:
1. Treq1 + maxInactiveInterval < Treq1 + Preq1req2 => maxInactiveInterval < Preq1req2
2. Tresp1 + maxInactiveInterval < Tresp1 + Presp1req2 => maxInactiveInterval < Presp1req2

This part, the servlet container will keep this session open between client accesses is a bit confusing. Does it mean between requests entering the container or between response exiting and requests entering?

On a side note, I know that the session might not be destroyed at the exact time of expiry, but I don't know yet if it is destroyed before any request processing logic occurs in the container. I am referring to the request that holds an expired session id.

Kind Regards,
Despot

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1  
Why does it matter? The time of a request is typically a few milliseconds. The session timeout is typically 30 minutes. Does it matter if it's 30.000 or 30.002? What is your end goal? Anyway, the answer is in the question: and marked by the time the container received the request –  JB Nizet Jan 4 '13 at 9:54
    
It matters, since I want to know at the client exactly what time the session will be expired. "the answer is in the question: and marked by the time the container received the request" this might only refer to the lastAccessedTime. Are you sure that the expiration time is going to be session.getLastAccessedTime() + (session.getMaxInactiveInterval() * 1000) (1. case)? Is there any source out there that could confirm it? Thanks for the comment! –  despot Jan 4 '13 at 10:11
2  
And you want to have that precise to the millisecond? Does the end-user care if it's in 30 minutes or in 30 minutes and 8 milliseconds? Anyway, the session won't be destroyed at that time, since the container typically uses a background thread that destroys expired sessions every minute or so. –  JB Nizet Jan 4 '13 at 10:19
    
Firstly, the processing on the server could take more than 8 milliseconds, and secondly, I need to make sure that I am not sending a request at a certain endpoint with an expired session (and I want to maximize the time I send requests to this endpoint). "the session won't be destroyed at that time" I understand this(see the part "On a side note"). This doesn't answer the question of the server expiration time (not destroying time). I want to understand first, how exactly the server calculates the expiration time. –  despot Jan 4 '13 at 10:53
    
The way to be sure you aren't sending a request to a timed-out session is to send it and deal with the resulting error condition(s). Which you have to do anyway. Any predictive approach is bound to fail sooner or later, and amounts to nothing more than fortune-telling in reality. –  EJP Jan 4 '13 at 11:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The session mechanism is part of the Servlet specification, which mandates:

In the HTTP protocol, there is no explicit termination signal when a client is no longer active. This means that the only mechanism that can be used to indicate when a client is no longer active is a time out period.

The default time out period for sessions is defined by the servlet container and can be obtained via the getMaxInactiveInterval method of the HttpSession interface. This time out can be changed by the Developer using the setMaxInactiveInterval method of the HttpSession interface. The time out periods used by these methods are defined in seconds. By definition, if the time out period for a session is set to -1, the session will never expire. The session invalidation will not take effect until all servlets using that session have exited the service method. Once the session invalidation is initiated, a new request must not be able to see that session.

The getLastAccessedTime method of the HttpSession interface allows a servlet to determine the last time the session was accessed before the current request. The session is considered to be accessed when a request that is part of the session is first handled by the servlet container.

It is probably safe to assume that the "inactive interval" starts with the "lastAccessedTime".

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ok, so session expiry time should be calculated with session.getLastAccessedTime() + (session.getMaxInactiveInterval() * 1000), and the case 1. is the correct one?! –  despot Jan 8 '13 at 15:52
    
I am going to assume the above. –  despot Jan 9 '13 at 11:09

I am trying to figure out if session.getLastAccessedTime() + (session.getMaxInactiveInterval() * 1000) will give me the exact time in milliseconds of session expiry each time a request comes with the same session id!

since you can access session object only in a request thread I am assuming you are having above code in a servlet for informing client(browser) on what time he can take before his next click, may be a timeout counter.

I assume System.currentTimeMillis() + (session.getMaxInactiveInterval() * 1000) will be more accurate in that case.

share|improve this answer
    
"for informing client(browser)" precisely. "I assume System.currentTimeMillis() + (session.getMaxInactiveInterval() * 1000)" so you are assuming that it is the 2. case?! Any source so we can be sure on this? Thanks for your answer! –  despot Jan 4 '13 at 10:13

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