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I need to do the CountDown Days from one date to the second date

e.g

CURRENT_DATE:3/1/2013 NEXT_DATE:21/01/2013

then it displays ::17 DAYS LEFT

I implemented code like these

String inputDateString = "01/22/2013";
Calendar calCurr = Calendar.getInstance();
Calendar calNext = Calendar.getInstance();
calNext.setTime(new Date(inputDateString)); 

if(calNext.after(calCurr)) 
{
    long timeDiff = calNext.getTimeInMillis() - calCurr.getTimeInMillis();
    int daysLeft = (int) (timeDiff/DateUtils.DAY_IN_MILLIS);
    dni.setText("Days Left: "+daysLeft);
}
else
{
    long timeDiff = calCurr.getTimeInMillis() - calNext.getTimeInMillis();
    timeDiff = DateUtils.YEAR_IN_MILLIS - timeDiff;
    int daysLeft = (int) (timeDiff/DateUtils.DAY_IN_MILLIS);
}

Is there a better way to do achieve these?

share|improve this question
3  
Use JodaTime, it's kind of simple stuff with such library ;-) stackoverflow.com/questions/8026136/… – Marek Sebera Jan 4 '13 at 11:06
    
See this question about countdown to Christmas, using Joda-Time. – Basil Bourque Mar 2 '14 at 11:22
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using Calendar's Methods:

String inputDateString = "01/22/2013";
Calendar calCurr = Calendar.getInstance();
Calendar day = Calendar.getInstance();
day.setTime(new SimpleDateFormat("MM/dd/yyyy").parse(inputDateString));
if(day.after(calCurr)){
               System.out.println("Days Left: " + (day.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH) -(calCurr.get(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH))) );
}

Output: Days Left: 17

And to increment the year by 1 , you could use Calendar.add() method

        day.add(Calendar.YEAR, 1);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. [chars] – Radek.Dev Jan 4 '13 at 11:19
    
@Radek.Dev you are welcome.. :) – PermGenError Jan 4 '13 at 11:20

The other answers ignore time zone, which may be crucial depending on how accurate you want your countdown. If you do not specify a time zone, you get the JVM's default.

The java.util.Date & .Calendar classes are notoriously troublesome. Avoid them. Use either Joda-Time or the new java.time package in Java 8.

A bit of code in Joda-Time 2.3, untested (off the top of my head). Search StackOverflow for many more examples.

String input = "01/22/2013";
DateTimeZone timeZone = DateTimeZone.forID( "Europe/Paris" );
DateTimeFormatter formatterInput = DateTimeFormat.forPattern( "MM/dd/yyyy" ).withZone( timeZone );
DateTime future = formatterInput.parseDateTime( input );

DateTime now = new DateTime( timeZone );

int days = Days.daysBetween( now, future ).getDays();
Interval interval = new Interval( now, future );
Period period = new Period( interval );

Do some System.out.println calls for those variables and be amazed.

The string format you'll see is ISO 8601. You can create other formats as well.

share|improve this answer

I searched this code on internet, but didn't manage to find. Though I'm replying late, this will be useful piece of code.

public static String getTimeLeft(String date) { // dateFormat = "yyyy-MM-dd"
    String[] DateSplit = date.split("-");
    int month = Integer.parseInt(DateSplit[1]) - 1, // if month is november  then subtract by 1
    year = Integer.parseInt(DateSplit[0]), day = Integer
            .parseInt(DateSplit[2]), hour = 0, minute = 0, second = 0;
    Calendar now = Calendar.getInstance();

    int sec = second - Calendar.getInstance().get(Calendar.SECOND), min = minute
            - Calendar.getInstance().get(Calendar.MINUTE), hr = hour
            - Calendar.getInstance().get(Calendar.HOUR_OF_DAY), dy = day
            - Calendar.getInstance().get(Calendar.DATE), mnth = month
            - Calendar.getInstance().get(Calendar.MONTH), daysinmnth = 32 - dy;

    Calendar end = Calendar.getInstance();

    end.set(year, month, day);

    if (mnth != 0) {
        if (dy != 0) {
            if (sec < 0) {
                sec = (sec + 60) % 60;
                min--;
            }
            if (min < 0) {
                min = (min + 60) % 60;
                hr--;
            }
            if (hr < 0) {
                hr = (hr + 24) % 24;
                dy--;
            }
            if (dy < 0) {
                dy = (dy + daysinmnth) % daysinmnth;
                mnth--;
            }
            if (mnth < 0) {
                mnth = (mnth + 12) % 12;
            }
        }
    }

    String hrtext = (hr == 1) ? "hour" : "hours", dytext = (dy == 1) ? "day"
            : "days", mnthtext = (mnth == 1) ? "month" : "months";

    if (now.after(end)) {
        return "";
    } else {
        String months = "", days = "", hours = "";
        months = (mnth > 0) ? mnth + " " + mnthtext : "";
        if (mnth <= 0) {
            days = (dy > 0) ? dy + " " + dytext : "";
            if (dy <= 0) {
                hours = (hr > 0) ? hr + " " + hrtext : "";
            }
        }
        //Log.d("DATE", months + " 1 " + days + " 2 " + hours);
        return months + days + hours;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I use this class

import android.text.format.DateUtils;

import java.util.Date;

import static android.text.format.DateUtils.FORMAT_NUMERIC_DATE;
import static android.text.format.DateUtils.FORMAT_SHOW_DATE;
import static android.text.format.DateUtils.FORMAT_SHOW_YEAR;
import static android.text.format.DateUtils.MINUTE_IN_MILLIS;

/**
 * Utilities for dealing with dates and times
 */
public class TimeUtils {

    /**
     * Get relative time for date
     *
     * @param date
     * @return relative time
     */
    public static CharSequence getRelativeTime(final Date date) {
        long now = System.currentTimeMillis();
        if (Math.abs(now - date.getTime()) > 60000)
            return DateUtils.getRelativeTimeSpanString(date.getTime(), now,
                    MINUTE_IN_MILLIS, FORMAT_SHOW_DATE | FORMAT_SHOW_YEAR
                    | FORMAT_NUMERIC_DATE);
        else
            return "Just now";
    }
}

TimeUtils.getRelativeTime(date) returns text like
Just now,
2 min. ago,
2 hours ago,
2 days ago,
04.11.2013

share|improve this answer

Refer the following example which is help full and well working for countdown timing

Countdown timer example

In this here it is showing the difference with number of days left with time in hours and minutes which is left .

share|improve this answer

There are several libraries to convert date to n days format:

share|improve this answer
    
How can I do so that it will be 17 days and sets up the date again? So to 21/01/2014. – Radek.Dev Jan 4 '13 at 11:10

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