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I have a struct with many members and with different types (it's like 20 members):

enum TheEnum
{
    FIRST = 0,
    SECOND,
    ...
}

struct TheStruct
{
    TheEnum z; // <--- the point !!! note that this is the first member (edited)
    int a;
    int b;
    char c[32];
    ...
}

Due to there is an enum type member, I cant just declare like:

TheStruct Object = {0};

It will give compile error, but this initialization is the best way in my opinion.

The other ways that I can think of is:
1. ZeroMemory it, but I dont like this one.
2. Write a constructor, but this needs a lot of work.
3. Just don't initialize it.

So, is there any way to solve the enum problem? Should I pick a way in these 3?
Thanks!

EDIT: My big mistake, the error only occurs when TheEnum presents as the first member.
Compiled using vs2008 and as C++ code.
The error is C2440. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/sy5tsf8z%28v=VS.80%29.aspx

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1  
What is the compiler error? Compiles fine: ideone.com/1XVVWO –  hmjd Jan 4 '13 at 11:15
    
it worked on gcc 4.7.2, am I missing something? –  billz Jan 4 '13 at 11:15
    
I compiled using vs2008 and as C++ code. The error is C2440. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/sy5tsf8z%28v=VS.80%29.aspx –  Marson Mao Jan 4 '13 at 16:43
    
Please give these crucial details in the question rather than in comments. Don't make us skull around the comments to find these details. –  David Heffernan Jan 4 '13 at 16:48
    
OK, I'll add to my post. Sorry for that. –  Marson Mao Jan 4 '13 at 17:08
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2 Answers

up vote -1 down vote accepted

[edit] as the question changed

If you initialize a struct, you have to provide the correct types in your initializer. In your case, the correct initialization would look like this:

TheStruct Object = {FIRST};

Your initialization list initializes the given number of struct members with what you have written and the rest of the struct with '0'. Since your first member is an enum, you have to initialize that enum in this case.

[/edit]

there is nothing necessary. if you're compiling in C and not C++ just don't forget to write enum and struct and everything should work...

enum TheEnum
{
    FIRST = 0,
    SECOND,
    ...
}

struct TheStruct
{
    int a;
    int b;
    char c[32];
    ...
    enum TheEnum z; // <--- the point !!!
}

struct TheStruct Object = {0};
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You know what other language does not have this problem? C#. Maybe the OP should compile as C#. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 4 '13 at 11:33
    
since the code above compiles just fine in C++ (also see comment of hmjd), my guess is, he inadvertendly compiled it as C code... –  rico Jan 4 '13 at 11:37
    
I compiled using vs2008 and as C++ code. The error is C2440. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/sy5tsf8z%28v=VS.80%29.aspx –  Marson Mao Jan 4 '13 at 16:41
    
with the edit of your question, see my edited answer for the solution... ;-) –  rico Jan 5 '13 at 15:58
    
although not expected as my imagination, but this is no doubt a correct answer. accepted and upvoted :p –  Marson Mao Jan 7 '13 at 1:27
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You can initialize the enum member just like any other. For example: TheStruct temp = {0,0,"", FIRST};

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Hi I edited the problem...sorry the enum member should be the first member. And I do want to use the = {0} trick instead of write each member specifically because there are too many to write. –  Marson Mao Jan 4 '13 at 16:47
    
Everything that's not initialized explicitly will be initialized to 0. In your case TheStruct temp = {FIRST}; will initialize the enum to FIRST and rest of the fields will be implicitly set to 0. –  icepack Jan 4 '13 at 16:55
    
That could work, maybe I'll try it. But is there a more "general" way to do it? If someone changes the names in TheEnum then I have to modify this initialzation. And somehow my attempt is like to set everything to zero and regardless of what is in TheEnum. –  Marson Mao Jan 4 '13 at 17:11
    
The more general way is to define a constructor –  icepack Jan 4 '13 at 17:27
    
as I said in my post...there are too many members. So u suggest no matter how many members there are, just init them all in ctor? –  Marson Mao Jan 4 '13 at 19:48
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