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I´m trying to implement A Practical Analytic Model for Daylight in Processing and project it on a 2d canvas. Everything works fine so far, except a nasty problem with the azimuth of the sun.

When i animate the time of the day, the sun is jumping to the opposite site on a specific time. This happens because the azimuth goes from -90 to +90 degree or vice versa. I´m not sure if that´s a restriction of the paper or i made a mistake calculating the solar position. As far as i understand the azimuth should be between 0 and 360 degree.

Anyone already implemented the Preetham paper and can help me?

Here´s my code to calculate the solar position. You can download the complete Processing sketch here: https://dl.dropbox.com/u/42247259/PreethamSky.zip

Thanks for your help. H.G.

private void calculateSolarPosition() {
    float t = solarTime(standardTime, dayOfYear, standardMeridian, longitude);
    float delta = solarDeclination(dayOfYear);
    thetaS = angleFromSunToZenith(t, delta, latitude);
    phiS = sunAzimuth(t, delta, latitude);
}

/// Returns the solar time at a certain geographic place, day of year and standard time.
private float solarTime(float standardTime, int dayOfYear, float standardMeridian, float longitude) {
    return (float)(standardTime + 0.17 * sin(4 * PI * (dayOfYear - 80) / 373) - 0.129 * sin(2 * PI * (dayOfYear - 8) / 355) + 12 * (standardMeridian - longitude) / PI);
}


/// Returns the solar declination. Solar declination is the angle between the rays of the sun and the 
/// plane of the earth's equator.
private float solarDeclination(int dayOfYear) {
    return (float)(0.4093 * sin(2 * PI * (dayOfYear - 81) / 368.0));
}


/// Returns the angle from the sun to the zenith in rad.
private float angleFromSunToZenith(float solarTime, float solarDeclination, float latitude) {
    return (float)(PI / 2 - asin(sin(latitude) * sin(solarDeclination) -  cos(latitude) * cos(solarDeclination) * cos(PI * solarTime / 12)));
}


/// Returns the azimuth of the sun in rad. Azimuth is the angle between a line to south and the sun.
private float sunAzimuth(float solarTime, float solarDeclination, float latitude) {
    return (float)-(atan((-cos(solarDeclination) * sin(PI * solarTime / 12)) /
        (cos(latitude) * sin(solarDeclination) - sin(latitude) * cos(solarDeclination) *
        cos(PI * solarTime / 12.0))));
}
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I have not tried that so it may not work (depends on the formula which I haven't studied in detail), but instead of atan you could use the atan2 function which gives a full 360 degree result.

/// Returns the azimuth of the sun in rad. Azimuth is the angle between a line to south and the sun.
    private float sunAzimuth(float solarTime, float solarDeclination, float latitude) {
    return (float)-(atan2((-cos(solarDeclination) * sin(PI * solarTime / 12)),
        (cos(latitude) * sin(solarDeclination) - sin(latitude) * cos(solarDeclination) *
        cos(PI * solarTime / 12.0))));
}

This function takes into account the signs of numerator and denominator to decide in which quadrant the angle should be.

share|improve this answer
    
wow, thanks for the fast answer. Works great. – Hans Gruber Jan 4 '13 at 11:59
    
You should mark this answer as the correct one in this case ;) – Matt Jan 4 '13 at 16:17

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