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I would like to to understand how the output works here from this java code.. kindly help ! I took this code from a book called Head First Java here is the code:

public class EchoTestDrive {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Echo e1 = new Echo();
        Echo e2 = new Echo(); // the correct answer
        //or
        Echo e2 = e1; // is the bonus answer!
        int x = 0;
        while (x < 4) {
            e1.hello();
            e1.count = e1.count + 1;
            if (x == 3) {
                e2.count = e2.count + 1;
            }
            if (x > 0) {
                e2.count = e2.count + e1.count;
            }
            x = x + 1;
        }
        System.out.println(e2.count);
    }
}

class Echo {

    int count = 0;

    void hello() {
        System.out.println("helloooo... ");
    }
}

and this is the output:

  %java EchoTestDrive
   helloooo...
   helloooo...
   helloooo...
   helloooo...
   10
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1  
Please format your code prior to posting. –  jlordo Jan 4 '13 at 11:20
1  
@OliCharlesworth : why hello is printed four times & atlast a 10 ? –  user1221765 Jan 4 '13 at 11:21
12  
Is that even compiling? Two variables with the same.. Specifically e2 –  Lews Therin Jan 4 '13 at 11:22
2  
@Buba1947 - have a look at the innre if(x>0) where e2 is incremented by e1. You can "play" the code and the variable values on paper and should see why 10 is printed. –  Matten Jan 4 '13 at 11:25
1  
@LewsTherin : I took this code from a book called Head First java –  user1221765 Jan 4 '13 at 11:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Well....

helloooo... being output 4 times is from...

    while (x < 4) {
        e1.hello();
        x = x + 1;
    }

As for the count to 10, (assuming Echo e2 = e1; is meant to be Echo e3 = e1;...

After iteration x = 0: e1.count == 1, e2.count == 0;

After iteration x = 1: e1.count == 2, e2.count == 2;

After iteration x = 2: e1.count == 3, e2.count == 5;

After iteration x = 3: e1.count == 4, e2.count == 10;

Though that interpretation leaves e3 completely unused.

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Thank you for your effort.. –  user1221765 Jan 4 '13 at 11:33

I don't see what this question could be about except aliasing. If you have this line:

Echo e2 = new Echo();

then e2 is an object separate from e1 and has its own count variable. If you use this:

Echo e2 = e1;

then you have a total of one Echo instance, pointed to by both e1 and e2.

The rest is just fiddly details on how and when the count variable is updated in the loop.

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The example is like fill in the blanks from source code pool.

You have completed it fine and you might be wondering why the difference occurs for below

Bonus Answer! 
24
correct Answer!
10

In correct case which is

Echo e2 = new Echo(); // the correct answer 

You are creating separate instance of Echo so it will has its own count and every time you say e2.count you are accessing this count.

In Bonus Answer case

Echo e2 = e1;

You have two references point to same object so when you do e2.count you are accessing count for e1 and e2

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1  
good explanation.. thank you –  user1221765 Jan 4 '13 at 11:41

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