Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a C++ program that uses the RRD libraries that require an array of 'const char*' for their functions. I thought I could just declare the array, and then initialize each element of the array, but changing one, changes all of them. Obviously I'm missing something. Here's an example similar to the code I am writing (i.e. it exhibits the same problem).

string intToString(long i)
{
    stringstream ss;
    string s;
    ss << i;
    s = ss.str();
    return s;
}

int main(){
        const char* av[5];
        int i = 0;
        int j = 0;
        for(i=0;i<5;i++){
                j= 0;
                av[i] = intToString(i).c_str();
                for(j=0;j<5;j++){ cout << j << " : " << av[j] << endl;}
        }   

}

Any help would be appreciated.

share|improve this question
1  
Running this code crashes VS2008, since av[5] is not initialised, but its used in the for(j=0... loop. –  quamrana Sep 12 '09 at 17:47
    
Side note: In your intToString function, just do: return ss.str();. There's no need to make a copy, then return hat copy. –  GManNickG Sep 12 '09 at 20:17

3 Answers 3

The const char* returned by the c_str() method of a std::string points to a buffer owned by the std::string and only remains valid until the next call to a mutating method of the std::string. If you want to retain the contents of this buffer, you need to copy its contents somewhere else.

Edit: Alternatively, you could retain an array of std::string to manage the storage of the strings and temporarily store the c_str() pointers in a parallel array of const char* as required for the interface. This obviates the need to copy the strings or manually deallocate the copies. In any case, it's important to not change any std::string while you are holding the const char* value returned by a prior call to c_str().

share|improve this answer

string::c_str returns temporary pointer. You could use strdup to get persistent pointer.

// don't forget to release memory later
av[i] = strdup( intToString(i).c_str(); );

Or you could allocate all buffers manually and then use string::copy to copy string data.

share|improve this answer
1  
True. c_str is valid only as long as the string that returned it is. Another approach would be to store the return of intToString(i) in an array: string avs[5]; ... avs[i]=intToString(i); av[i]=avs[i].c_str(); (although I don't see any reason to store the char * at all) –  Jonathan Graehl Sep 12 '09 at 17:48
    
@Downvoter: Care to comment? Which bit do you disagree with? –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Sep 12 '09 at 19:08

Bringing everything together, you can write your program like this:

#include <sstream>
#include <iostream>

std::string intToString(long i)
{
    std::stringstream ss;
    std::string s;
    ss << i;
    s = ss.str();
    return s;
}

int main(){
    const char* av[5];   // declared but not initialised
    std::string sav[5];  // std::string has a ctor, so they're initialised
    for(int i=0;i<5;i++){
    	av[i]="";    // initialise each const char*
    }

    for(int i=0;i<5;i++){
    	sav[i] = intToString(i);  // Keep the original in sav[]
    	av[i] = sav[i].c_str();   // point to each string's contents
    	for(int j=0;j<5;j++){ std::cout << j << " : " << av[j] << std::endl;}
    }   

}

Note that your program prints every av[] after each av[] is re-initialised.

Note that memory management is handled by sav[]

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.