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Question: I want to fill in database data into the properties and fields of an instance of a class in its constructor.

  public class Profile : ProfileOverview
    {

        public Profile()
        { }

        public Profile(long ProfileId)
        {
            using (System.Data.IDbCommand cmd = Settings.DAL.CreateCommand("SELECT * FROM Profiles WHERE ProfileId = @__in_profileid"))
            {
                Settings.DAL.AddParameter(cmd, "__in_profileid", ProfileId);

                this = Settings.DAL.GetClass<Models.Profile>(cmd);
            } // End Using cmd

        } // End Constructor

       ... (some properties and fields)
}

The problem is, the compiler says that it cannot assign "this", because it is write protected. Is it really necessary that I have to change my database abstraction layer to pass "this" to it, or can I do that somehow ?

The problem is, GetClass calls Activator.CreateInstance to create a new instance of Models.Profile, and I'd prefer to keep this that way (because GetClass is a function and not a procedure).

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IMO this code is bad design in the first place. Your constructor shouldn't fetch data from the database. –  CodesInChaos Jan 4 '13 at 13:13
    
constructor is used to initialize it member variabler...not.also you cannot modify this itself –  Anirudha Jan 4 '13 at 13:14
    
As a side-note: It's possible to assign to this if you're working on a value-type. But don't use a value-type here. –  CodesInChaos Jan 4 '13 at 13:16
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You cannot assign this. Consider altering your pattern like so:

public class Profile : ProfileOverview
{

    public Profile()
    { }

    public static Profile Get(long ProfileId)
    {
        using (System.Data.IDbCommand cmd = Settings.DAL.CreateCommand("SELECT * FROM Profiles WHERE ProfileId = @__in_profileid"))
        {
            Settings.DAL.AddParameter(cmd, "__in_profileid", ProfileId);

            return Settings.DAL.GetClass<Models.Profile>(cmd);
        } // End Using cmd
    }

   ... (some properties and fields)
}

Update
Based on comments from @CodeInChaos and @weston, it's only fair that I add here that the above code is bad design. The static loader method would ideally live in a different class whose purpose it is to load your Profile. Consider the following basic example:

public class Profile : ProfileOverview
{
    public Profile() { }

   ... (some properties and fields)
}

public class ProfileHelper
{
    public Profile LoadProfileById(long ProfileId)
    {
        using (System.Data.IDbCommand cmd = Settings.DAL.CreateCommand("SELECT * FROM Profiles WHERE ProfileId = @__in_profileid"))
        {
            Settings.DAL.AddParameter(cmd, "__in_profileid", ProfileId);

            return Settings.DAL.GetClass<Models.Profile>(cmd);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Works, but is still bad design. –  CodesInChaos Jan 4 '13 at 13:14
    
@CodesInChaos. Agree somewhat. I would normally go with a helper or factory to create/load the Profile. –  flem Jan 4 '13 at 13:16
    
@CodesInChaos I agree. Now it's just a static method, consider moving to a new class who's sole job is to load Profiles from the database. –  weston Jan 4 '13 at 13:18
    
@flem: It is possible to assign it by changing GetClass to take "this" as argument, but it is dangerous, because the "this" parameter is not permitted to be passed by reference, so if anyone passes a already created instance of a class as argument, then it may not work. –  Quandary Jan 4 '13 at 13:29
    
@Quandary. If you pass this to a method as a parameter and set the value of the parameter, you will merely be changing the reference of the parameter, not the value of the original this. –  flem Jan 4 '13 at 14:29
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