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Need help.. Please tell me why " A.clear() " does not clear the first column too? ........................................................

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

int N, M;
vector< vector<int> > A;
int main()
{
    cin >> N >> M;
    A.resize(N + 2);
    for (int i = 0; i <= N; ++i)
    {
        A[i].resize(M + 2);
    }
    A.clear();
    for (int i = 0; i <= N; ++i)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j <= M; ++j)
        {
            cout << A[i][j] << ' ';
        }
        cout << '\n';
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
2  
1. What output do you expect? 2. What output do you get? Hint: you are accessing things that used to be in the vector before you cleared it. What do you think is there now? Is it safe to access it? – BoBTFish Jan 4 '13 at 13:38
    
You posted working code, which is great; but as BoBTFish suggested you need to be more precise in your question. Here is your code rewritten with at() calls instead of operator [] calls on the vector object. – Matthieu M. Jan 4 '13 at 13:43
    
I will, but this is my first post and I didn't know. Thank you! – user1948703 Jan 4 '13 at 14:31
up vote 2 down vote accepted

clear removes all elements of the vector as opposed to setting all of them to 0 as you seem to be expecting. After calling clear the size of your vector is 0. Thus when you try to read A[i][j] you are accessing an index out of bounds and anything may happen(your code causes undefined behavior).

share|improve this answer
    
I understand now, thank you! But, how should I allocate a dynamic matrix of N x M size ? – user1948703 Jan 4 '13 at 13:47
2  
@user1948703 it is perfectly fine and I believe the best solution is to use a vector for that. Still to fill a vector with zeros, use std::fill defined in algorithm or simply do a cycle. clear is what you do wrong, not the rest of the code. Also please always check the sizes of the vector(i.e. don't use M and N, but A.size() and A[i].size()) – Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 4 '13 at 13:51
    
A.resize(N + 2); fill(A.begin(), A.end(), vector<int> (M + 1)); That's working. Is it good? – user1948703 Jan 4 '13 at 13:57
    
@user1948703 It does, only thing I don't get is why first size is N+2. Also please note you may initialize the vector during resize like: A.resize(N + 2, vector<int>(M+1, 0));. – Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 4 '13 at 14:00
    
That's it, thank you very much, I figured it out now :) – user1948703 Jan 4 '13 at 14:05

A.clear() does clear the array in the sense that as the result, A contains zero elements. This is not the same as setting every element to zero.

Your code has undefined behaviour since the post-A.clear() loop accesses elements past the end of the now empty vector. It just so happens that the memory is still accessible and still contains the old data. However, this is not guaranteed to be the case.

If you iterated using the correct dimensions, you'd see that A is empty:

for (int i = 0; i < A.size(); ++i)
{
    for (int j = 0; j < A[i].size(); ++j)
    {
        cout << A[i][j] << ' ';
    }
    cout << '\n';
}
share|improve this answer
1  
By using the at function instead that overloaded [] you could catch such things. – Jack Jan 4 '13 at 13:38

You are invoking undefined behaviour. A.clear() is working fine, but you are reading memory that you shouldn't be. Try with "< A.size()" instead of "<= N"

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