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I have this problem where I have to find the shortest path in an NxM grid from point A (always top left) to point B (always bottom right) by only moving right or down. Sounds easy, eh? Well here's the catch: I can only move the number shown on the tile I'm sitting on at the moment. Let me illustrate:

2 5 1 2
9 2 5 3
3 3 1 1
4 8 2 7

In this 4x4 grid the shortest path would take 3 steps, walking from top left 2 nodes down to 3, and from there 3 nodes right to 1, and then 1 node down to the goal.

[2] 5  1  2
 9  2  5  3
[3] 3  1 [1]
 4  8  2 [7]

If not for the shortest path, I could also be taking this route:

[2] 5 [1][2]
 9  2  5  3
 3  3  1 [1]
 4  8  2 [7]

That would unfortunately take a whopping 4 steps, and thus, is not in my interest. That should clear things out a bit. Now about the input.


The user inputs the grid as follows:

5 4      // height and width
2 5 2 2  //
2 2 7 3  // the
3 1 2 2  // grid
4 8 2 7  //
1 1 1 1  //

Homework

I have thought this through, but cannot come to a better solution than to simplify the inputted grid into an unweighed (or negative-weight) graph and run something like dijkstra or A* (or something along those lines) on it. Well... this is the part where I get lost. I implemented something to begin with (or something to throw to thrash right away). It's got nothing to do with dijkstra or A* or anything; just straight-forward breadth-first search.


The Code

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

struct Point;

typedef std::vector<int> vector_1D;
typedef std::vector< std::vector<int> > vector_2D;
typedef std::vector<Point> vector_point;

struct Point {
    int y, x;
    vector_point Parents;
    Point(int yPos = 0, int xPos = 0) : y(yPos), x(xPos) { }

    void operator << (const Point& point) { this->Parents.push_back(point); }
};

struct grid_t {
    int height, width;
    vector_2D tiles;

    grid_t() // construct the grid
    { 
        std::cin >> height >> width; // input grid height & width

        tiles.resize(height, vector_1D(width, 0)); // initialize grid tiles

        for(int i = 0; i < height; i++)     //
            for(int j = 0; j < width; j++)  // input each tile one at a time
                std::cin >> tiles[i][j];    // by looping through the grid
    }
};

void go_find_it(grid_t &grid)
{
    vector_point openList, closedList;
    Point previous_node; // the point is initialized as (y = 0, x = 0) if not told otherwise
    openList.push_back(previous_node); // (0, 0) is the first point we want to consult, of course

    do
    {
        closedList.push_back(openList.back()); // the tile we are at is good and checked. mark it so.
        openList.pop_back(); // we don't need this guy no more

        int y = closedList.back().y; // now we'll actually
        int x = closedList.back().x; // move to the new point

        int jump = grid.tiles[y][x]; // 'jump' is the number shown on the tile we're standing on.

        if(y + jump < grid.height) // if we're not going out of bounds
        { 
            openList.push_back(Point(y+jump, x)); // 
            openList.back() << Point(y, x); // push in the point we're at right now, since it's the parent node
        }
        if(x + jump < grid.width) // if we're not going out of bounds
        { 
            openList.push_back(Point(y, x+jump)); // push in the new promising point
            openList.back() << Point(y, x); // push in the point we're at right now, since it's the parent node
        }
    }
    while(openList.size() > 0); // when there are no new tiles to check, break out and return
}

int main()
{
    grid_t grid; // initialize grid

    go_find_it(grid); // basically a brute-force get-it-all-algorithm

    return 0;
}

I should probably also point out that the running time cannot exceed 1 second, and the maximum grid height and width is 1000. All of the tiles are also numbers from 1 to 1000.

Thanks.


Edited Code

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

struct Point;

typedef std::vector<int> vector_1D;
typedef std::vector< std::vector<int> > vector_2D;
typedef std::vector<Point> vector_point;

struct Point {
    int y, x, depth;
    vector_point Parents;
    Point(int yPos = 0, int xPos = 0, int dDepth = 0) : y(yPos), x(xPos), depth(dDepth) { }

    void operator << (const Point& point) { this->Parents.push_back(point); }
};

struct grid_t {
    int height, width;
    vector_2D tiles;

    grid_t() // construct the grid
    { 
        std::cin >> height >> width; // input grid height & width

        tiles.resize(height, vector_1D(width, 0)); // initialize grid tiles

        for(int i = 0; i < height; i++)     //
            for(int j = 0; j < width; j++)  // input each tile one at a time
                std::cin >> tiles[i][j];    // by looping through the grid
    }
};

int go_find_it(grid_t &grid)
{
    vector_point openList, closedList;
    Point previous_node(0, 0, 0); // the point is initialized as (y = 0, x = 0, depth = 0) if not told otherwise
    openList.push_back(previous_node); // (0, 0) is the first point we want to consult, of course

    int min_path = 1000000;

    do
    {
        closedList.push_back(openList[0]); // the tile we are at is good and checked. mark it so.
        openList.erase(openList.begin()); // we don't need this guy no more

        int y = closedList.back().y; // now we'll actually move to the new point
        int x = closedList.back().x; //
        int depth = closedList.back().depth; // the new depth

        if(y == grid.height-1 && x == grid.width-1) return depth; // the first path is the shortest one. return it

        int jump = grid.tiles[y][x]; // 'jump' is the number shown on the tile we're standing on.

        if(y + jump < grid.height) // if we're not going out of bounds
        { 
            openList.push_back(Point(y+jump, x, depth+1)); // 
            openList.back() << Point(y, x); // push in the point we're at right now, since it's the parent node
        }
        if(x + jump < grid.width) // if we're not going out of bounds
        { 
            openList.push_back(Point(y, x+jump, depth+1)); // push in the new promising point
            openList.back() << Point(y, x); // push in the point we're at right now, since it's the parent node
        }
    }
    while(openList.size() > 0); // when there are no new tiles to check, break out and return false

    return 0;
}

int main()
{
    grid_t grid; // initialize grid

    int min_path = go_find_it(grid); // basically a brute-force get-it-all-algorithm

    std::cout << min_path << std::endl;
    //system("pause");
    return 0;
}

The program now prints the correct answer. Now I have to optimize (run time is way too big). Any hints on this one? Optimizing is the one thing I suck at.


The Answer

In the end the solution appeared to consist of little code. The less the better, as I like it. Thanks to Dejan Jovanović for the beautiful solution

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>

struct grid_t {
    int height, width;
    std::vector< std::vector<int> > tiles;
    std::vector< std::vector<int> > distance;

    grid_t() // construct the grid
    { 
        std::cin >> height >> width; // input grid height & width

        tiles.resize(height, std::vector<int>(width, 0)); // initialize grid tiles
        distance.resize(height, std::vector<int>(width, 1000000)); // initialize grid tiles

        for(int i = 0; i < height; i++)     //
            for(int j = 0; j < width; j++)  // input each tile one at a time
                std::cin >> tiles[i][j];    // by looping through the grid
    }
};

int main()
{
    grid_t grid; // initialize grid

    grid.distance[0][0] = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < grid.height; i++) {
        for(int j = 0; j < grid.width; j++) {
            if(grid.distance[i][j] < 1000000) {
                int d = grid.tiles[i][j];
                if (i + d < grid.height) {
                    grid.distance[i+d][j] = std::min(grid.distance[i][j] + 1, grid.distance[i+d][j]);
                }
                if (j + d < grid.width) {
                    grid.distance[i][j+d] = std::min(grid.distance[i][j] + 1, grid.distance[i][j+d]);
                }
            }
        }
    }
    if(grid.distance[grid.height-1][grid.width-1] == 1000000) grid.distance[grid.height-1][grid.width-1] = 0;
    std::cout << grid.distance[grid.height-1][grid.width-1] << std::endl;
    //system("pause");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
So what's the question? –  NPE Jan 4 '13 at 13:44
    
The question is, how should I do this? I don't care for the plain answer, but a hint would get me going. –  Olavi Mustanoja Jan 4 '13 at 13:51
    
Just treat it like any other directed graph, and use a normal pathfinding algorithm. Where is your confusion? –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jan 4 '13 at 17:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is need to construct the graph, this can easily be solved with dynamic programming using one scan over the matrix.

You can set the distance matrix D[i,j] to +inf at the start, with D[0,0] = 0. While traversing the matrix you just do

if (D[i,j] < +inf) {
  int d = a[i, j];
  if (i + d < M) {
    D[i + d, j] = min(D[i,j] + 1, D[i + d, j]);
  }
  if (j + d < N) {
    D[i, j + d] = min(D[i,j] + 1, D[i, j + d]);
  }
}

The final minimal distance is in D[M -1, N-1]. If you wish to reconstruct the path you can keep a separate matrix that marks where the shortest path came from.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh my god... I mean oh my you! If this can be done then I ought'a read about dynamic programming o_o This worked like a charm –  Olavi Mustanoja Jan 4 '13 at 20:55
    
@OlaviMustanoja This is a particular implementation of graph traversal, not divide-and-conquer dynamic programming. Unlike the other solutions, it can't be adapted to move up or left for negative numbers. The computational complexity is actually greater than a breadth-first search, with the additional optimization of not enqueueing moves to already-reachable nodes. (Guaranteeing the BFS would visit each node at most once; this visits every node exactly once.) –  Potatoswatter Jan 5 '13 at 5:38
    
@Potatoswatter Dynamic programming is a general idea. In fact Dijkstra's algorithm and BFS can be seen as an instance of dynamic programming. This algorithm is in essence the same as Dykstra's algorithm/BFS, in that it visits the nodes in the order such that when a node is picked, its shortest path is already known. As far as complexity goes, this approach is done in the same time you need to construct the full graph (visit all nodes and edges). –  Dejan Jovanović Jan 5 '13 at 15:53
    
@DejanJovanović According to Wikipedia dynamic programming can be summarized as divide-and-conquer with memoization, and that's more in line with what I learned. Dijkstra and BFS are greedy algorithms. Without a step that chooses a partition point, it's hard to characterize something as DP. But this does use the memoization part. –  Potatoswatter Jan 6 '13 at 0:06

Start off with a brute force approach to get it to work, then optimize from there. The brute force is straight-forward: run it recursively. Take your two moves, recurse on those, and so on. Collect all the valid answers and retain the minimum. If the run time is too long, then you can optimize by a variety of means. For instance, some of the moves may be invalid (because they exceed a dimension of the grid) and can be eliminated, and so on. Keep optimizing until a worst case input runs at the desired speed.

Having said that, the performance requirements only make sense if you are using the same system and inputs, and even then there are some caveats. Big O notation is a much better way of analyzing the performance, plus it can point you to an algorithm and eliminate the need for profiling.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, at this time I know the client's specs. He's / they're running on a 2Ghz Linux machine. Another limiting factor I forgot to mention is the memory limit, which is 128 MB –  Olavi Mustanoja Jan 4 '13 at 14:01
    
Ahhhhh, sorry then. When you wrote "homework" I took it literally :P. Have you profiled the brute force (recursive) approach? –  RonaldBarzell Jan 4 '13 at 14:03
    
No I haven't yet. Shouldn't take too long :D But isn't recursive approach like myriad seconds slower than an iterative one? –  Olavi Mustanoja Jan 4 '13 at 14:08
    
Recursive approach (by which you probably mean depth-first), as NPE validly commented, requires you to search the entire problem space, then to find the lowest-cost one. Breadth-first search is optimal, as it searches by increasing depth, and stops at the shortest possible solution. –  Amadan Jan 4 '13 at 14:08
    
Oh dear I mixed up recursive approach and recursive function... –  Olavi Mustanoja Jan 4 '13 at 14:12

You're overthinking it. :) Run a Breadth-First Search. The solution space is a binary tree, where each node branches into "right" or "down". From current point, generate the down point and right point, stuff their coordinates into a queue, repeat until at finish.

Without checking, something like this:

queue = [{ x: 0, y: 0, path: [] }] # seed queue with starting point
p = nil
do
  raise NoSolutionException if p.empty? # solution space exhausted
  p = queue.pop # get next state from the back of the queue
  break if p.x == MAX_X - 1 && p.y == MAX_Y - 1 # we found final state
  l = grid[p.x][p.y] # leap length

  # add right state to the front of the queue
  queue.unshift({x: p.x + l, y: p.y, path: p.path + [p] }) if p.x + l <= MAX_X

  # add down state to the front of the queue
  queue.unshift({x: p.x, y: p.y + l, path: p.path + [p] }) if p.y + l <= MAX_Y
end
puts p.path

Uglifying into C++ left as exercise for the reader :p

share|improve this answer
    
That would make you explore every valid path, wouldn't it? –  NPE Jan 4 '13 at 13:46
    
@NPE: I am an idiot and shouldn't answer questions late at night. BFS, not DFS, as I described, not as I named. BFS automatically finds shortest path. Anyway, edited; thanks for pointing out the brainfart. –  Amadan Jan 4 '13 at 13:55
    
You have a point right there and it looks promising. Thanks alot –  Olavi Mustanoja Jan 4 '13 at 14:11
    
Edited the code. See notes –  Olavi Mustanoja Jan 4 '13 at 14:50

Build an unweighted directed graph:

  1. There are NxM vertices. In what follows, vertex v corresponds to grid square v.
  2. There is an arc from vertex u to v iff you can jump from grid square u to square v in a single move.

Now apply a shortest path algorithm from the top-right vertex to the bottom-left.

Finally, observe that you don't actually need to build the graph. You can simply implement the shortest path algoritm in terms of the original grid.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried to build the graph, I failed. The only way I can think of building the graph is the breadth-first search. Now that wouldn't make sense, right? I think I'll catch on to your second advice, however :o –  Olavi Mustanoja Jan 4 '13 at 14:06
    
It makes eminent sense. BFS is the optimal solution. And only now do I see that you've pretty much done exactly that. –  Amadan Jan 4 '13 at 14:10
    
I meant first profiling the graph using BFS and then searching through it using BFS :D BFS BFS BFS –  Olavi Mustanoja Jan 4 '13 at 14:14
    
Edited the code. See notes –  Olavi Mustanoja Jan 4 '13 at 14:53

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