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This is the error:

DummyService.hpp:35: error: invalid covariant return type for 'virtual std::vector < ResourceBean*, std::allocator < ResourceBean*> >& DummyService::list(const std::string&)'

class Bean {
public:
    typedef std::string Path;
    virtual ~Bean() {};
    virtual const Path& getPath() = 0;
    virtual const std::string& getName() = 0;
protected:
    Bean();
};

class ResourceBean: public Bean {
public:
    ResourceBean(const Path& path, const std::string& contents) :
            _path(path), _contents(contents) {
    }
    virtual ~ResourceBean() { }
    virtual const Path& getPath();
    virtual void setPath(const Path& path);
    virtual const std::string& getName();
    virtual void setName(const std::string& name);
private:
    Path _path;
    std::string _name;
};

The above Bean classes are data representations, and they are used by two different layers. One layer uses the Bean interface, just to access the getters for the data. The ResourceBean is accessed by the data access object (DAO) classes, which take the data from a database (for example), and fill in the ResourceBean.

One responsibility of the DAO is to list the resources given a certain path:

class Service {
protected:
    /*
     * Service object must not be instantiated (derived classes must be instantiated instead). Service is an interface for the generic Service.
     */
    Service();

public:
    virtual std::vector<Bean*>& list(const Bean::Path& path) = 0;
    virtual ~Service();
};

class DummyService: public Service {
public:
    DummyService();
    ~DummyService();

    virtual std::vector<ResourceBean*>& list(const ResourceBean::Path& path);
};

I think the problem is related with the fact that in std::vector<ResourceBean*> the compiler does not understand that Bean is actually the base class of ResourceBean.

Any suggestions? I've read to some similar topics but some of the solutions did not work in my case. Please point out if I have missed something. Thank you in advance.

share|improve this question
1  
Before you go any further, notice that your code is not typesafe (it it were to compile). A std::vector<ResourceBean*> is not a valid subtype (in the general LSP sense) of a std::vector<Bean*>, because a std::vector<ResourceBean*> does not support all the operations that a std::vector<Bean*> does (for example, you can put any Bean* into a std::vector<Bean*>, while you may only put a ResourceBean* into a std::vector<ResourceBean*>). –  Mankarse Jan 4 '13 at 13:53
    
Thank you for your reply. I'm trying to understand why you say that "a std::vector<ResourceBean*> does not support all the operations that a std::vector<Bean*> does". Also, when you say "you can put any Bean* into a std::vector<Bean*>, while you may only put a ResourceBean* into a std::vector<ResourceBean*>", do you mean that you can put any Bean* (including * to derived classes)? –  Constantin Levodeanschi Jan 4 '13 at 14:01
    
Yes. For example you can put a FooBean* into a std::vector<Bean*> (where FooBean is some subclass of Bean), but you can't put a FooBean* into std::vector<ResourceBean*>. If some code uses Service::list and expects a reference to std::vector that a FooBean* can be placed into, then the std::vector<ResourceBean*> returned by DummyService::list will not be enough. –  Mankarse Jan 4 '13 at 14:17
    
Ah I understand, thank you for pointing that out. –  Constantin Levodeanschi Jan 4 '13 at 14:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

std::vector<Bean*> and std::vector<ResourceBean*> are two completely distinct types that are not convertible to each other. You simply cannot do that in C++ and should stick with a vector of pointer to the base class instead. Also, because of that, having that function virtual is not doing what you think it does — different return types make it a different method signature so instead of overloading a method, you introduce a new virtual method. Also, there is no need to make a constructor protected for an abstract class (Service) because you cannot create instance of an abstract class anyway. I'd write it something like this:

#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

class Bean {
  public:
    typedef std::string Path;

    Bean() {}
    virtual ~Bean() {}

    virtual void say() const
    {
        std::cout << "I am a bean!\n";
    }
};

class ResourceBean : public Bean {
  public:
    ResourceBean() {}
    virtual ~ResourceBean() {}

    virtual void say() const
    {
        std::cout << "I am a resource bean!\n";
    }
};

class Service {
public:
    Service() {}
    virtual ~Service() {}

    virtual std::vector<Bean*>& list(const Bean::Path &path) = 0;
};

class DummyService: public Service {
  public:
    DummyService()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 5; ++i)
            beans_.push_back(new ResourceBean());
    }

    virtual ~DummyService() {}

    virtual std::vector<Bean *>& list(const Bean::Path &path)
    {
        return beans_;
    }

  private:
    std::vector<Bean*> beans_;
};

int main()
{
    DummyService s;
    std::vector<Bean *>& l = s.list("some path");
    for (std::vector<Bean *>::iterator it = l.begin(), eit = l.end();
         it != eit; ++it)
    {
        Bean *bean = *it;
        bean->say();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Makes sense, but a Bean class cannot be filled in with data (since it contains only getters). Is there any way of returning std::vector<Bean*>& in the list method of DummyService, but converting from ResourceBean to Bean in that method? –  Constantin Levodeanschi Jan 4 '13 at 13:54
    
@user1570742: ResourceBean, when inherited from Resource, is implicitly convertible to Resource, its base class. I've edited my answer and added some example for that. –  user405725 Jan 4 '13 at 14:05
1  
Thank you for taking the time to explain this. It works perfectly now. –  Constantin Levodeanschi Jan 4 '13 at 14:47
    
@user1570742: you are very welcome –  user405725 Jan 4 '13 at 21:16

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