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I'm using ARM Cortex-A8 and trying to read the value from CCNT time counter through the assembly code.  I am following this post How to measure program execution time in ARM Cortex-A8 processor? . In accordance with it, before I can read the value from timer, I have to enable counter, enable a 64-bit divider and clear overflows. These operations are performed by writing inside the appropriate registers (for instance, PMCR (Performance Monitro Control Register)). So, I am printed counter values in a loop to keep track how overflow occurs and I have this behavior:

1           (starts to incrementing after it was reset to zero)
4650
4858
4943
5023
...
...        (incrementing...)
...
4293939054
4293939128       (overflow happens)
1602570          
1602703
1602788
...
...
4293522911
4293522987
4293523062
4293523137
1186243
1186367
1186453
1186536
1186612
1186686
...
4293536300
4293536377
4293536456
4293536533
4293536612
1199090
1199209
1199295
1199373
1199453
1199530
….
and so forth.

Accordingly, I have a set of questions:

a) Which or the said above registers are used by the Linux kernel ? (how reliable is the information for further kernel versions). How safe can be the change of their values?

b) what is the accurate value of CCNT frequency and how to get it? Unfortunately, I can’t find the value in processor spec. However, dmesg says that

[ 0.000000] OMAP clocksource: GPTIMER2 at 24000000 Hz
[ 0.000000] sched_clock: 32 bits at 24MHz, resolution 41ns, wraps every 178956ms
[ 0.132855] Switching to clocksource gp timer

But identifying it manually, against the clock_gettime, gives me 7 MHz. So, why it is not 24 MHz as expected?

c) According to my first output, why after the overflow it starts not with zero, but from about 1 mil ?

d) Why without 64 divider am I getting wrong results? The value starts to jump this way:

...
134110099
134114934
134119656
302352300
302361825
302367135
…
2885588930
2885593776
2885598630
3053958670
3053966752
3053972232
…
261130096
261134909
429343853
429351487
429356735

I'd appreciate any help. Thanks

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

a) PMU regs may be used by the perf subsystem of the Linux kernel (accessed through the perf userspace tool).

b) CCNT frequency is a Cortex-A9 CPU cycle counter, or cycles/64 if you enable the divider. So 7MHz with the divider would be an average CPU clock of around 450 MHz. This is separate from the 24 MHz system clock.

c) maybe your process got scheduled out. This is a low level cycle counter for the whole CPU, not just your process. It will keep running when in the kernel or in another process. On the other hand if your process migrates to another CPU you will then access that CPU's cycle counter (which might not even have the same divider setting). If you want a consistent count you should be pinning your process to one CPU.

d) similar answer to (c), you may be seeing the effect of process scheduling and migration.

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1  
Thank you for a quick response. Regarding b) - My question is why I get 7 MHz (450 MHz)? I expected that CCNT was that system clock and I got its 24 MHz value of frequency ? My aim is avoiding system call and get access to the kernel's preferable clock and I was thinking that is the CCNT. If not, how can I get access to the system clock? –  Irina Jan 5 '13 at 10:47
    
No, CCNT is driven from CPU cycles (possibly divided by 64). CPU clock frequency may vary with DVFS (dynamic voltage/frequency scaling). If you want to read a timer running at a constant frequency, you need to access the global timer, not CCNT. –  Al Grant Jan 7 '13 at 14:48

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