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ArrayList<Class> name = new ArrayList<Class>(#)

Someone told me yesterday that something like this is bad practice, and that I should program “against the interface”, like this:

List<Class> name = new ArrayList<Class>(#)

What did he mean?

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closed as not a real question by Wooble, Bob Kaufman, Mike, Charles Menguy, Lars Kotthoff Jan 4 '13 at 18:40

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What do YOU mean? –  Mob Jan 4 '13 at 14:06
1  
You'd have to ask him what he meant. It's not always bad practice to program against a concrete type. In fact, it frequently isn't and a lot of things don't have interfaces. It depends on your project design and there's no simple answer. You ought to read some books on object oriented design as this is a subject frequently covered in OOD books and web sites. It isn't necessarily a good StackOverflow question, however, as it depends largely on peoples opinions and not necessarily facts. –  Pete Jan 4 '13 at 14:06
    
@Pete you should always use the most generic superclass (including interfaces) whose contract provides the operations that you need. Unless the OP is using some method that is available in ArrayList and not in List, he should define the variable as List –  SJuan76 Jan 4 '13 at 14:08
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8 Answers

This should help you understand what an interface is and how it is useful in software development.

Let's say you need to mail a package to someone. There are many carrier options: USPS, UPS, FedEx, etc.

Now imagine if there was one , central mailbox you could drop your package into and all carriers could deliver from that mailbox. So, you don't care how it gets picked up by USPS, UPS or FedEx. All you need to do is bring your package to the mailbox and drop it off. How it actually gets delivered is irrelevant to you.

In this example, you could have an interface defined as:

public interface IMailService
{
   void SendMail(obj myMailObj);
}

And then you could have concrete implementations of MailService defined as:

public class USPSMailService : IMailService
{
   public void SendMail(obj myMailObj)
   {
      //This code executes SendMail using USPS' implementation
   } 
}
public class UPSMailService : IMailService
{
   public void SendMail(obj myMailObj)
   {
      //This code executes SendMail using UPS' implementation
   } 
}
public class FedExMailService : IMailService
{
   public void SendMail(obj myMailObj)
   {
      //This code executes SendMail using FedEx's implementation
   } 
}

Then, when you want to send mail in your code, you would write it like this:

IMailService mailService = new FedExMailService();
mailService.SendMail(myMailObj);

If you later need to use UPS' mail service, then all you'd need to do is instantiate with the UPS type. The rest of the code, including all calls to SendMail() remain unchanged:

mailService = new UPSMailService();

Now, if UPS offers some service that the other carriers do not, then you would need to define the variable as the concrete type.

For example, if the UPS class was defined as such:

public class UPSMailService : IMailService
{
   public void SendMail(obj myMailObj)
   {
      //This code executes SendMail using UPS' implementation
   } 

   //This is a method that only UPS offers
   public void SendMailOnSunday(obj myMailObj)
   {
      //This code executes UPS' proprietary method
   } 
}

Then your code would need to use the concrete class as such:

UPSMailService mailService = new UPSMailService();
mailService.SendMailOnSunday(myMailObj);
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In Interface defines what methods are available, so when a class is written to implement an interface, it must have the methods defined in the interface. (it may have other methods as well)

Suppose you write a class which other people will use, and it has a method like this:

public void doSomething(List<Thing> aListOfThings) {
  //some code to manipulate the list
}

When other people write code to use your class, you don't care exactly what type of List they've used to call your method. All of these are valid:

yourClass.doSomething(new ArrayList<Thing>());
yourClass.doSomething(new AttributeList<Thing>());
yourClass.doSomething(new Vector<Thing>());
yourClass.doSomething(new SomeOtherTypeOfList<Thing>());

They are free to choose whatever type (implementation) of list is suitable for their purposes.

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He meant that you should use only the very type of the variable you need. For example, unless you are using methods that are only defined on ArrayList then you should use List. Likewise, if you don't need anything that comes from List then use Collection etc.

There are two reasons for this:

1) It makes it easier in the future to change the implementation to another type. Lets say you are using some ORM that uses a LazilyLoadedList, well if all your code is against List then you can slot it in painlessly. If it is against ArrayList then you need to change lots of method signatures and make sure that you aren't depending on a ArrayList specific methods. This is part of what

2) Interfaces are easier to mock using tools like JMock or Mockito.

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The "interface" in that code snippet is List being a more abstract class than ArrayList.

List will be implemented by a number of other classes like ArrayList, LinkedList etc...

By using the interface to declare name, then the users of name do not have to know which type of list name actually is, and if you decide to use a different type of List in future you can without having to change lots of places within your code.

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Ideally, you want to use the interface of a collection rather than the implementation for Collection variables and return values. In your example, it's not that big an issue. Where it does become more useful is when writing methods:

public List<String> doSomething() {
}

By using List<String> and not ArrayList<String>, this method could choose a different list to use (it might change to LinkedList for example), but the contract of the API wouldn't change, so all the calling code would still work, even though the method now returns a different type of List.

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There is no need to reveal what exact implementation of List you're using.

The only methods that are available to you are the methods from the interface. Technically it doesn't matter a lot, but it's a good habit to follow. The code is cleaner and easier to maintain.

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What is “the interface”? Talk to me like you are talking to an old person who has never used a computer before. –  Eamon Moloney Jan 4 '13 at 14:08
3  
I am afraid this forum is not very suited for "old person who has never used a computer". –  SJuan76 Jan 4 '13 at 14:09
2  
    
I'm not really old – it was a simile. –  Eamon Moloney Jan 4 '13 at 14:11
1  
@EamonMoloney List is the interface, and ArrayList is a particular implementation of that interface. –  Jesper Jan 4 '13 at 14:37
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ArrayList implements List. So, best to use List for a number of reasons. For example, if you wish to change the type of list (e.g. you decide to use a LinkedList, Stack, or Vector) in the future, you need only change the right side of the assignment and the rest of the code just works, unchanged.

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List<Class> name = new ArrayList<Class>(#)
SuperType   ref  =     SubTypeObj

This is polymorphic way of creating an ArrayList. List is a super type of ArrayList. The advantage of creating the arraylist like this is:

  • you could later refer the same list to create a LinkedList.

    name = new LinkedList(#)

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