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Here in my Java Jersey Rest service, for an update method, the value "money" is represented as long in server. And valid values are between 30.00 and 500.00

Which one is more standart approach? should I force the client to send money value as 30.00 with a dot and parse manually in server than make it double/long. Or sent as 3000 and parse that way. Or there is already a way to this in java/jerseylibrary.

@PUT
@Path("/money")
@Consumes("text/plain)
public void updateThreshold(String threshold) {

*//check value and update in server*
}

note: I don't want to use parametrized requests to set parameter type as double

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It will be much more easier to save all data in cents. Its avoid you from some possible problems with rounding, and different data formats (in such countries used ',' as separator, in other '.'), Also storing and sorting by int value in DB more better too.

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tnx I dont know cents, is it a standart or just a naming, how do I convert it? –  Spring Jan 4 '13 at 15:09
    
I think @Imysak mean cents..as in the currency unit.. Dollars, cents etc) –  Anurag Kapur Jan 4 '13 at 15:11
    
thanx @anurag-kapur, I mean if you have double with 2 digit precision, you can store it as int (just x100, so you keep needed precision well). –  iMysak Jan 4 '13 at 15:19

If using cents is not an option for you, how about letting user pass a string and then using Float.parseFloat(floatval)?

Works for string inputs like: 30.98, 30 and 30.00 Example:

    String amount1 = "30.98";
    String amount2 = "30";
    String amount3 = "30.00";
    System.out.println("Amount :: " + Float.parseFloat(amount1));
    System.out.println("Amount :: " + Float.parseFloat(amount2));
    System.out.println("Amount :: " + Float.parseFloat(amount3));

Output:

Amount :: 30.98
Amount :: 30.0
Amount :: 30.0
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