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I wrote this implementation of Dijksta's Algorithm, which at each iteration of the loop while Q is not empty instead of finding the minimum element of the queue it takes the head of the queue.

Here is the code i wrote

#include <stdio.h>
#include <limits.h>

#define INF INT_MAX
int N;
int Dist[500];
int Q[500];
int Visited[500];
int Graph[500][500];

void Dijkstra(int b){
     int H = 0;
     int T = -1;
     int j,k;

Dist[b] = 0;

Q[T+1] = b;
T = T+1;

while(T>=H){
    j = Q[H];
    Visited[j] = 1;
    for (k = 0;k < N; k++){
        if(!Visited[k] && Dist[k] > Graph[j][k] + Dist[j] && Graph[j][k] != -1){
            Dist[k] = Dist[j]+Graph[j][k];
            Q[T+1] = k;
            T = T+1;
        }
    }

    H = H+1;
}
}  

int main(){

int src,target,m;
int a,w,b,i,j;

scanf("%d%d%d%d",&N,&m,&src,&target);

for(i = 0;i < N;i ++){
    for(j = 0;j < N;j++){
        Graph[i][j] = -1;
    }
}

for(i = 0; i< N; i++){
    Dist[i] = INF;
    Visited[i] = 0;
}


for(i = 0;i < m; i++){
    scanf("%d%d%d",&a,&b,&w);
    a--;
    b--;
    Graph[a][b] = w;
    Graph[b][a] = w;
}

Dijkstra(src-1);


if(Dist[target-1] == INF){
    printf("NO");
}else {
    printf("YES\n%d",Dist[target-1]);
}

return 0;
}

I ran this for all the test cases i ever found and it gave a correct answer.
My question is the why do we need to find the min at all? Can anyone explain this to me in plain english ? Also i need a test case which proves my code wrong.

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1  
Dijkstra is a greedy algorithm, so you pick the currently known best solution at that time. So what you wrote is not Dijkstra's algorithm. –  Thomas Jungblut Jan 4 '13 at 15:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Take a look at this sample:

1-(6)-> 2 -(7)->3
  \          /
   (7)     (2)
     \    /
       4

I.e. you have edge with length 6 from 1 to 2, edge with length 7 from 2 to 3, edge with length 7 from 1 to 4 and edge from 4 to 3. I believe your algorithm will think shortest path from 1 to 3 has length 13 through 2, while actually best solution is with length 9 through 4.

Hope this make it clear.

EDIT: sorry this example did not brake the code. Have a look at this one:

8 9 1 3
1 5 6
5 3 2
1 2 7
2 3 2
1 4 7
4 3 1
1 7 3
7 8 2
8 3 2

Your output is Yes 8. While a path 1->7->8->3 takes only 7. Here is a link on ideone

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I tried that input (4 4 1 3\n1 2 6\n2 3 7\n1 4 7\n4 3 2\n), which gives me YES\n9\n. Clearly the right answer, so it's not a counter-example. –  Rhymoid Jan 4 '13 at 15:11
    
Yes i tried that in ideone ideone.com/6XRsj5 –  338327 Jan 4 '13 at 15:17
    
I am sorry you are right. I am adding a valid example. I will not draw it as it turned out to be quite big. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 4 '13 at 15:21
    
So the problem is that the number of nodes matters as well. –  Rhymoid Jan 4 '13 at 15:25
    
The problem is that by choosing always the head of the queue that is not ordered by distance, he violates the optimal property of dijkstra. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 4 '13 at 15:26

I think your code has the wrong time complexity. Your code compares (almost) all pairs of nodes, which is of quadratic time complexity.

Try adding 10000 nodes with 10000 edges and see if the code can execute within 1 seconds.

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And to reduce the asymptotic complexity of the algorithm, you use a queue instead. –  Rhymoid Jan 4 '13 at 15:12
    
Yes! Exactly, sorry for not pointing it out. –  Marcus Johansson Jan 4 '13 at 15:13
2  
Although this is actually Dijkstra's original algorithm. According to Wikipedia, the version using a heap is due to Fredman & Tarjan. –  Rhymoid Jan 4 '13 at 15:14

As pointed out by @izomorphius: your algorithm is easily confused by the length of the path in terms of nodes. Consider this example:

5 5 1 2
1 3 21
3 2 21
1 4 1
4 5 1
5 2 1

Clearly, the path {1,4,5,2} is the shortest path, with a length of 3. However, the program answers:

YES
42

Which corresponds to the path {1,3,2}. So you have a bug in your implementation somewhere, causing it to prefer paths with fewer hops.


As for the necessity of the queue: it reduces the cost of execution, as pointed out by @MarcusJohansson. Dijkstra's original version didn't use a queue, and took O(V^2) time (V being the number of vertices). The improved version by Michael Lawrence Fredman and Robert E. Tarjan incorporated a queue, making the execution time O(E+V log V) (E being the number of edges).

You could argue that for certain situations, it might be better to not use a queue. For instance, in complete graphs, E = V(V-1)/2 which is in O(V^2). The queue might then just slow you down.

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thanks for all your answers –  338327 Jan 5 '13 at 1:51

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