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Business:

Practical background for all that is design of web-app, where web-page constructed from prototype objects, gadgets, which individually defined each in its own view function (its own code, not necessarily django-view function). And to build a 'production' web-page they can be placed in regular view, related to this page, and produce web-page elements according to given source-data and other parameters. For example I have a chart-gadget, and it receives source data, parameters, about chart-type, beauty/colors etc, and draws a chart. How can it be stored in separate from specific ap, loose-coupled code? Which design-approach is better?

What Ive tried:

Ive tried 'dumb' way:

For example I have a simple view:

from django.shortcuts import render_to_response
from django.template import Template, Context
from string import letters
def home(request):
    t = Template("""<ul>
                        {% for key, value in d.items %}
                            <li>{{ key }}: {{ value }}</li>
                        {% endfor %}
                    </ul>""")
    d = {k: v for v, k in enumerate(letters)}
    return render_to_response('home.html', {'t': t, 'd':d})

And template:

<html>
<head>
    <title>Django tests</title>

</head>
<body>
{% include t with d=d %}
</body>
</html>

With such setup I get: TemplateDoesNotExist

Expectations about answer:

Im searching any reasonable scheme for storing chunk of web-page, which designed to kinda live by its own life, less-or-more separately from other elements of web-page, in a similarly separate chunk of code in web-app program backend. As example I can provide such projects as:

Thank you!




ps

Extracts from django-docs:

{% extends variable %} uses the value of variable. If the variable evaluates to a string, Django will use that string as the name of the parent template. If the variable evaluates to a Template object, Django will use that object as the parent template.

So It means, that with {% extends %} tag, operation what Im talking in question is definitely possible.

This example includes the contents of the template whose name is contained in the variable template_name:

{% include template_name %}

So it probably means, that variable passed to {% include %} can bu just a string with name of file. And if its true, it is clear answer on my question - template defined in variable cannot be included in regular template.
It still slightly ambiguous for me, because in Python word name might be used as synonym of variable.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

As someone already mentioned in a comment, you need to just render your template to a string and pass it in to the second template, marking it as a safe string so it isn't auto-escaped. So, your example would be:

from django.shortcuts import render_to_response
from django.template import Template, Context
from django.utils.safestring import mark_safe
from string import letters
def home(request):
    t = Template("""<ul>
                        {% for key, value in d.items %}
                            <li>{{ key }}: {{ value }}</li>
                        {% endfor %}
                    </ul>""")
    c = Context({'d': {k: v for v, k in enumerate(letters)}})
    return render_to_response('home.html', {'t': mark_safe(t.render(c))})

Then, in home.html, render with {{ t }}

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You should put your include template in it's own file

include.html:

<ul>
    {% for key, value in d.items %}
        <li>{{ key }}: {{ value }}</li>
    {% endfor %}
</ul>

home.html:

<html>
    <head>
        <title>Django tests</title>
    </head>
    <body>
        {% include 'include.html' with d=d %}
    </body>
</html>

Then your view becomes:

def home(request):
    d = {k: v for v, k in enumerate(letters)}
    return render_to_response('home.html', {'d':d})
share|improve this answer
    
The goal is in using template defined in variable –  Gill Bates Jan 4 '13 at 16:07
1  
You should probably just render your template and mark it as safe and use the template directly in the template. docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/ref/utils/… –  Iain Shelvington Jan 4 '13 at 16:11

You should render your sub-template, then place it in the context of your home.html template (as t in this case). This is what I've used before for recursive templates.

home.html

<html>
<head>
    <title>Django tests</title>
</head>
<body>
    {{ t }}
</body>
</html>

views.py

from django.shortcuts import render_to_response
from django.template import Template, Context
from string import letters

def home(request):
    t = Template("""<ul>
                        {% for key, value in d.items %}
                            <li>{{ key }}: {{ value }}</li>
                        {% endfor %}
                    </ul>""")
    d = {k: v for v, k in enumerate(letters)}
    t_rendered = t.render(Context({'d': d}))
    return render_to_response('home.html',
                              {'t': t_rendered})

Note that you can cache your sub-template by creating it outside of the view so it doesn't get created on every request. You can use loader to keep your sub-template in a template file. However, changes will not reflect until you restart the server.

from django.shortcuts import render_to_response
from django.template import Template, Context, loader
from string import letters

t = loader.get_template('subtemplate.html')

def home(request):
    d = {k: v for v, k in enumerate(letters)}
    t_rendered = t.render(Context({'d': d}))
    return render_to_response('home.html',
                              {'t': t_rendered})    
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i believe render_to_response is a shortcut operation. I don't think it takes a template as 2nd param but a context instead

return render_to_response('home.html', {'d': d,})

<html>
<head>
    <title>Django tests</title>

</head>
<body>

<ul>
   {% for key, value in d.items %}
     <li>{{ key }}: {{ value }}
   {% endfor %}
</ul>

</body>
</html>

Yo ucould create a list template in your template dir and include it in your template https://docs.djangoproject.com/en/dev/ref/templates/builtins/?from=olddocs#include It looks like include just takes a template name and not a dynamic template

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