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This seems impossible (and it might be), but I'm trying to get into more TDD and I keep hitting a wall with closures. Say I have the following:

function createSomething(init) {
    function privateMethod(param) {
        return init[param];  //assuming this is more complicated, how can you test it?
    }

    function getData() {
        return init.data;
    }

    function getValue(name) {
        if (name === "privateNode" || typeof name !== "string") {
            return "permissionDenied";
        }
        return privateMethod(name);
    }

    return {
        getData : getData,
        getValue: getValue
    };
}

Putting aside this code probably isn't the best illustration of my point and assuming "privateMethod" is something much more complicated than what is above, is there any way to run unit tests on methods like "privateMethod" or is the best you can do is to test the object created by createSomething? I ask because large parts of my application are hidden inside closures. I'm pretty uninformed in this area, but it seems to me that this is a weak spot for javascript and tdd. fiddle for the code above without tdd is here: http://jsfiddle.net/QXEKd/

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just saw this... stackoverflow.com/questions/6626231/… I might need to modify the question as my focus is a bit different in that I won't be able to smuggle in functions because they will be accessing data available only inside the closure. –  Shane Jan 4 '13 at 15:33
    
The smuggled function should still have the closure from where it was smuggled from unless you're doing something like the evil eval. See this. –  Paul S. Jan 4 '13 at 15:35
1  
The advice I've seen on testing private methods is "don't". Test the only the public interface, leaving you free to refactor the internals. –  Odalrick Jan 4 '13 at 15:40
    
It might me worth noting that if you're taking functions out like this for testing purposes only, it might be preferable to comment out or otherwise remove the code to access these before publishing it on your website, so it can't be abused. Also, be aware that this will change depending on how a function is invoked, if you are using it. –  Paul S. Jan 4 '13 at 15:43
    
@PaulS - thanks, your fiddle looks like enough for me to get a solution going. Would you mind putting your comment in answer form so I can check it off? –  Shane Jan 4 '13 at 15:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can "smuggle" a function (or an Object of functions, variables, etc) out of your closure quite easily by adding an extra parameter to the constructor or hard-coding an early return. The smuggled function should still have the closure from where it was smuggled from unless you're doing something like the evil eval.

It might me worth noting that if you're taking functions out like this for testing purposes only, it may be preferable to comment out or otherwise remove the code to access these before publishing it on your website, so it can't be abused. Also, be aware that this will change depending on how a function is invoked, if you are using it.

For example

function createSomething(init, aaa) {
    function privateMethod(param) {
        return init[param];  //assuming this is more complicated, how can you test it?
    }

    function getData() {
        return init.data;
    }

    function getValue(name) {
        if (name === "privateNode" || typeof name !== "string") {
            return "permissionDenied";
        }
        return privateMethod(name);
    }
    // ----------------------------------
    if(aaa) return privateMethod;
    // ----------------------------------
    return {
        getData : getData,
        getValue: getValue
    };
}

var something = createSomething({
    privateNode : "allmysecrets",
    id : "1234",
    data : {
        stuff : "32t97gfhw3hg4"
    }
}, 1); // passing extra arg to get method

console.log(
    something('id'),
    something('privateNode')
) // 1234 allmysecrets
share|improve this answer
1  
To take it a bit further (excellent suggestion, btw) you could make that secondary param be a test config object that could allow for a testing abstraction layer to allow testing for only one function at a time. This would prevent abuse in that the end user would never have access to all the internals. I'm loving this, thanks! –  Shane Jan 4 '13 at 15:52
    
@Shane, yes, you can add more abstraction layers etc. but you can't really assume anything is "secure" in JavaScript. What I was saying about preventing abuse is more to do with "within the closure" than viewing how it is written. –  Paul S. Jan 4 '13 at 15:56
    
agreed, I'm just concerned about API abuse and runtime creation of objects that could manipulate functionality outside the api's authorizations, etc. –  Shane Jan 4 '13 at 15:57

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