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Let's say I have an array with 5 elements. How can I calculate all possible repetitive permutations of this array in C.

Edit: What I mean is creating all possible arrays by using that 5 number. So the positon matters.

Example:

array = [1,2,3,4,5]

[1,1,1,1,1]
[1,1,1,1,2]
[1,1,1,2,3]
.
.
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1  
[1,1,1,1,1] is not a permutation of [1,2,3,4,5]. [3,2,5,4,1] is –  BlackBear Jan 4 '13 at 15:36
    
@BlackBear there is a term permutation with repetition and [1,1,1,1,1] is a valid permutation with repetition of [1,2,3,4,5] –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 4 '13 at 15:38
2  
You seem to be talking about combinations rather than permutations, although I suppose it's a form of permutation if you're concerned with the order as well as the elements. –  Caleb Jan 4 '13 at 15:39
    
Is there an accepted term for what OP is looking for? Something like "all possible arrays of size 5 with elements from [1,2,3,4,5]," but shorter? –  iamnotmaynard Jan 4 '13 at 15:40
    
@Caleb I think here permutation is different from combination in the sense that [1,2,1,2,1] is different from [1,1,1,2,2] –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 4 '13 at 15:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
int increment(size_t *dst, size_t len, size_t base) {
    if (len == 0) return 0;
    if (dst[len-1] != base-1) {
        ++dst[len-1];
        return 1;
    } else {
        dst[len-1] = 0;
        return increment(dst, len-1, base);
    }
}

Armed with this function you can iterate over all repetitive permutations of (0 ... 4) starting from {0, 0, 0, 0, 0}. The function will return 0 when it runs out of repetitive permutations.

Then for each repetitive permutation in turn, use the contents as indexes into your array so as to get a repetitive permutation of the array rather than of (0 ... 4).

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A common way to generate combinations or permutations is to use recursion: enumerate each of the possibilities for the first element, and prepend those to each of the combinations or permutations for the same set reduced by one element. So, if we say that you're looking for the number of permutations of n things taken k at a time and we use the notation perms(n, k), you get:

perms(5,5) = {
    [1, perms(5,4)]
    [2, perms(5,4)]
    [3, perms(5,4)]
    [4, perms(5,4)]
    [5, perms(5,4)]
}

Likewise, for perms(5,4) you get:

perms(5,4) = {
    [1, perms(5,3)]
    [2, perms(5,3)]
    [3, perms(5,3)]
    [4, perms(5,3)]
    [5, perms(5,3)]
}

So part of perms(5,5) looks like:

[1, 1, perms(5,3)]
[1, 2, perms(5,3)]
[1, 3, perms(5,3)]
[1, 4, perms(5,3)]
[1, 5, perms(5,3)]
[2, 1, perms(5,3)]
[2, 2, perms(5,3)]
...

Defining perms(n, k) is easy. As for any recursive definition, you need two things: a base case and a recursion step. The base case is where k = 0: perms(n, 0) is an empty array, []. For the recursive step, you generate elements by prepending each of the possible values in your set to all of the elements of perms(n, k-1).

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If I get your question correctly, you need to generate all 5 digit numbers with digits 1,2,3,4 and 5. So there is a simple solution - generate all numbers base five up to 44444 and then map the 0 to 1, 1 to 2 and so on. Add leading zeros where needed - so 10 becomes 00010 or [1,1,1,2,1].

NOTE: you don't actually have to generate the numbers themselves, you may just iterate the numbers up to 5**5(excluding) and for each of them find the corresponing sequence by getting it's digits base 5.

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In your given example, each position could be occupied by either 1, 2, 3, 4, 5. As there are 5 positions, the total number of possibilities = 5 * 5 * 5 * 5 * 5 = 5 ^ 5 = 3125. In general, it would be N ^ N. (where ^ is the exponentiation operator).

To generate these possibilities, in each of the positions, put the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, one by one, and increment starting from the last position, similar to a 5 digit counter.

Hence, start with 11111. Increment the last position to get 11112 ... until 11115. Then wrap back to 1, and increment the next digit 11121 continue with 11122 ... 11125, etc. Repeat this till you reach the first position, and you would end at 55555.

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