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I wrote a pthread code today:

#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdio.h>

pthread_mutex_t mutex = PTHREAD_MUTEX_INITIALIZER;

void *thread1(void *arg)
{
    while (1) {
        pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
        sleep(1);
        printf("thread1...\n");
        pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
    }
}

void *thread2(void *arg)
{
    while (1) {
        pthread_mutex_lock(&mutex);
        sleep(1);
        printf("thread2...\n");
        pthread_mutex_unlock(&mutex);
    }
}

int main()
{
    pthread_t tid1, tid2;
    pthread_create(&tid1, NULL, thread1, NULL);
    pthread_create(&tid2, NULL, thread2, NULL);

    pthread_join(tid1, NULL);
    pthread_join(tid2, NULL);

    return 0;
}

I expect it will run like:

thread1...
thread2...
thread1...
thread2...

But in fact it run:

thread1...
thread1...
thread1...
thread1...

The thread2 seems not run. Thus I run this code over one hour, thread2 just prints one line. Why don't they run interlaced?

My environment:

  • Ubuntu 10.04 x86_64
  • Linux ubuntu 2.6.32-36-generic #79-Ubuntu SMP Tue Nov 8 22:29:53 UTC 2011 x86_64 GNU/Linux
  • CPU: Intel Core i7 930 (4 cores, 8 threads)

Thank you.

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2  
The 1 second sleep should be moved outside the lock and you'll see slightly better results –  Petesh Jan 4 '13 at 15:59
    
What exactly are your reasons for thinking the threads would be interleaved? –  NPE Jan 4 '13 at 16:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Move the sleep outside of the mutex lock so the operating system process scheduling algorithm is freed to go look at the other thread. The problem is that when you sleep, the other thread can get scheduled but the lock is set so it doesn't. When thread 1 wakes up, it releases the lock but then loops right back to set it. Thread 2 ever hardly has a chance to get in. It is being starved.

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I would be surprised if this is correct although possibly it depends on the OS. If the mutex is locked by thread1, thread2 is in the wait queue for the lock. If thread1 unlocks and does spin around to re-lock the mutex I would think that it would be behind thread2 in the queue -- especially if they are the same priority. But this may be an implementation detail. I would also think that thread1 unlocking would cause thread2 to be released immediately but that may not be how it works. –  Gray Jan 4 '13 at 16:30
    
OK, Thank you.. –  rta Jan 6 '13 at 13:16
1  
@Gray: Yes, depends on the OS. Not every implementation uses a wait queue. Some allow unlimited starvation of other threads. Some make it depend on attributes of the mutex. I believe the pthread mutex usually has a queue and a spin lock does not. –  Zan Lynx Oct 7 '13 at 20:06

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