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This is the code for deserialization:

XmlRootAttribute xRoot = new System.Xml.Serialization.XmlRootAttribute();
xRoot.ElementName = "myList";
xRoot.IsNullable = true;
xRoot.Namespace = "http://schemas.datacontract.org/2006/05/Blah.Blah.Blah";
XmlSerializer serializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(myList), xRoot);
XmlReader reader = new System.Xml.XmlTextReader(url);
myList myDeserializedList = (myList)serializer.Deserialize(reader);
reader.Close();

And myDeserializedList is empty, although when I go to the URL I see a pretty big XML.

Here are my classes:

[Serializable()]
public class myItem
{
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElement("Key")]
    public long Key { get; set; }
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlElement("Discount")]
    public double Discount { get; set; }
}


[Serializable, System.Xml.Serialization.XmlRoot("myList")]
public class myList
{
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlArray("myList")]
    [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlArrayItem("myItem", typeof(myItem))]
    public List<myItem> myItem { get; set; }
}

And here is the xml:

<myList xmlns="http://schemas.datacontract.org/2006/05/Blah.Blah.Blah" xmlns:i="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">
    <myItem>
        <Key>3465</Key>
        <Discount>0.00000000</Discount>
    </myItem>
</myList>
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1  
any specific reason for not considering linq2xml –  Anirudha Jan 4 '13 at 16:08
1  
When in doubt, create a sample myList with a myItem in memory and serialize it to XML then compare it to the source you're trying to read in. Usually that way you can see what's different and what needs changing to make it work. EDIT: For example, I'm betting that the way you have adorned it might come out as <myList><myList><myItem></myItem>...<myItem></myItem></myList></myList> (though I always have to double-check) –  Chris Sinclair Jan 4 '13 at 16:10
    
Do you have control over the data source (can you change the XML schema) or is it fixed? –  Chris Sinclair Jan 4 '13 at 16:18
    
@ChrisSinclair I have no control over it. –  petko_stankoski Jan 8 '13 at 11:39
    
@petko_stankoski That's OK, you can change the way you adorn the class to match the XML specification you're locked into. See my answer below. –  Chris Sinclair Jan 8 '13 at 12:10
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your code is attempting to read/write XML that looks like this:

<myList xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema" xmlns="http://schemas.datacontract.org/2006/05/Blah.Blah.Blah">
  <myList>
    <myItem>
      <Key>3465</Key>
      <Discount>0.00000000</Discount>
    </myItem>
  </myList>
</myList>

Notice the second myList tag wrapping the collection.

All you need to do is ditch the XmlArray and XmlArrayItem attributes and instead use XmlElement. This will instruct the XmlSerializer to place the item collection in-line and not nested within another element.

[Serializable, System.Xml.Serialization.XmlRoot("myList")]
public class myList
{
    [XmlElement]
    public List<myItem> myItem { get; set; }
}

EDIT: Also, you don't need to use most of the attributes; the XmlSerializer does a good job of applying default values that it becomes a bit redundant to redeclare them, so you could just have:

public class myItem
{
    public long Key { get; set; }
    public double Discount { get; set; }
}

public class myList
{
    [XmlElement]
    public List<myItem> myItem { get; set; }
}

And even ditch the xRoot.ElementName = "myList"; line and it will still produce the same exact XML. Feel free to keep it though if you want to make it very explicit as to what you expect or if you expect you might change your property/class identifiers without changing the XML.

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