Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Basically, I'm trying to create a new directory with today's date, then create a new file and save it in that folder.

I can get all the steps working separately, however the file doesn't want to be saved inside the directory. Basically I'm working with:

mkdir($today);
opendir(DIR, $today) or die "Error in opening dir $today\n";

    open SAVEPAGE, ">>", $savepage
    or die "Unable to open $savepage for output - $!";
    print SAVEPAGE $data;
    close(SAVEPAGE);

closedir(DIR);

I've done a lot of searches to try and find an appropriate example, but unfortunately every word in queries I've tried get millions of hits "open/save/file/directory" etc. I realise I could handle errors etc better, that'll be the next step once I get the functionality working. Any pointers would be appreciated, cheers.

share|improve this question
2  
You are confusing opendir with chdir. The former "opens" the directory, i.e. reads the file names it contains. The latter changes your working directory, like the command cd at the command prompt in *nix and windows. –  TLP Jan 4 '13 at 16:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Just prefix the file to open with the directory name. No need for opendir

mkdir($today);
open SAVEPAGE, ">>", "$today/$savepage";
share|improve this answer
    
It worked, thanks. –  Chris Keep Jan 4 '13 at 16:37
    
@ChrisKeep check the answer as accepted to help other people :). –  Giuliani Sanches Jan 4 '13 at 17:35
    
Thanks - have done. Found the answer too quick yesterday to be able to mark it as accepted at the same time :) –  Chris Keep Jan 5 '13 at 12:49

Rather than using the fully-qualified filename all the time you may prefer to use chdir $today before you open the file. This will change the current working directory and force a file specified using a relative path or no path at all to be opened relative to the new directory.

In addition, using the autodie pragma will avoid the need to check the status of open, close etc.; and using lexical filehandles is preferable for a number of reasons, including implicit closing of files when the filehandle variable goes out of scope.

This is how your code would look.

use strict;
use warnings;

use autodie;

my $today = 'today';
my $savepage = 'savepage';
my $data = 'data';

mkdir $today unless -d $today;
{
  chdir $today;
  open my $fh, '>>', $savepage;
  print $fh $data;
}

However, if your program deals with files in multiple directories then it is awkward to chdir backwards and forwards between them, and the original directory has to be explicitly saved otherwise it will be forgotten. In this case the File::chdir module may be helpful. It provides the $CWD package variable which will change the current working directory if its value is changed. It can also be localized like any other package variabled so that the original value will be restored at the end of the localizing block.

Here is an example.

use strict;
use warnings;

use File::chdir;
use autodie;

my $today = 'today';
my $savepage = 'savepage';
my $data = 'data';

mkdir $today unless -d $today;
{
  local $CWD = $today;  # Change working directory to $today

  open my $fh, '>>', $savepage;
  print $fh $data;
}

# Working directory restored to its previous value
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for the detailed answer, I will keep it mind when developing my script further. –  Chris Keep Jan 6 '13 at 17:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.