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I am backtesting some investment strategy using R, I have a piece of script below:

set.seed(1)
output.df <- data.frame(action=sample(c("initial_buy","sell","buy"),
          10000,replace=TRUE),stringsAsFactors=FALSE)
output.df[,"uid"] <- 1:nrow(output.df)

cutrow.fx <- function(output.df) {
  loop.del <- 2
  while (loop.del <= nrow(output.df)) {
    if ((output.df[loop.del,"action"]=="initial_buy" & 
            output.df[loop.del-1,"action"]=="initial_buy")|
          (output.df[loop.del,"action"]=="sell" & 
            output.df[loop.del-1,"action"]=="sell")|
          (output.df[loop.del,"action"]=="buy" & 
            output.df[loop.del-1,"action"]=="sell")|
          (output.df[loop.del,"action"]=="initial_buy" & 
            output.df[loop.del-1,"action"]=="buy")){
      output.df <- output.df[-loop.del,]
    } else {
      loop.del <- loop.del + 1
    }
  }
output.df<<-output.df
}

print(system.time(cutrow.fx(output.df=output.df)))

The strategy will determine: 1) when to start buying a stock; 2) when to add additional contribution to the stock; and 3) when to sell all the stock. I have a dataframe with price of a stock for the past 10 years. I wrote 3 scripts to indicate which date should I buy/sell the stock, combine the 3 results and order them.

I need to remove some of the "impossible action", e.g. I cannot sell the same stock twice without buying new units beforehand, so I used the script above to delete those impossible action. But the for loop is kind of slow.

Any suggestion for speeding it up?

Update 01

I have updated the cutrow.fx into the following but fail:

cutrow.fx <- function(output.df) {
  output.df[,"action_pre"] <- "NIL"
  output.df[2:nrow(output.df),"action_pre"] <- output.df[1:(nrow(output.df)-1),"action"]                    
  while (any(output.df[,"action_pre"]=="initial_buy" & output.df[,"action"]=="initial_buy")|
           any(output.df[,"action_pre"]=="sell" & output.df[,"action"]=="sell")|
           any(output.df[,"action_pre"]=="sell" & output.df[,"action"]=="buy")|
           any(output.df[,"action_pre"]=="buy" & output.df[,"action"]=="initial_buy")) {
    output.df <- output.df[!(output.df[,"action_pre"]=="initial_buy" & output.df[,"action"]=="initial_buy"),]
    output.df <- output.df[!(output.df[,"action_pre"]=="sell" & output.df[,"action"]=="sell"),]
    output.df <- output.df[!(output.df[,"action_pre"]=="sell" & output.df[,"action"]=="buy"),]
    output.df <- output.df[!(output.df[,"action_pre"]=="buy" & output.df[,"action"]=="initial_buy"),]
    output.df[,"action_pre"] <- "NIL"
    output.df[2:nrow(output.df),"action_pre"] <- output.df[1:(nrow(output.df)-1),"action"]                    
  }        
  output.df[,"action_pre"] <- NULL
  output.df<<-output.df
}

I used the vector comparison as somehow inspired (I used somehow as I'm not sure if I get exact what he means in the answer) by John, use a while-loop to repeat. But the output is not the same.

Is the for-loop here inevitable?

share|improve this question
    
Is the reason for this cutrow function to make the randomly sampled data more realistic? Or, is it intended to be used on real data? –  John Jan 4 '13 at 20:04
    
@Arun, i expect the new solution will give the same output as my old solution does, but in a faster way –  lokheart Jan 5 '13 at 2:15
    
@John, the cutrow function will be used on real data. –  lokheart Jan 5 '13 at 3:03

3 Answers 3

It looks like all you're doing is checking the last action. This doesn't require a loop at all. All you have to do is shift the vector and do straight vector comparisons. Here's an artificial example.

x <- sample(1:11)
buysell <- sample(c('buy', 'sell'), 11, replace = TRUE)

So, I have 11 samples, x, and whether I've bought or sold them. I want to make a boolean that shows whether I bought or sold the last sample.

bought <- c(NA, buysell[1:10])
which( bought == 'buy' )

Examine the x and buysell variables and you'll see the results here are the index of the x items where a buy was made on the prior item.

Also, you might want to check out he function %in%.

share|improve this answer
1  
I was thinking about an rle based strategy (i.e. find and delete runs composed all of "initial_buy", or of multiple "buys" followed by a "sell", etc.), but this would take some careful thought which I don't want to do right now ... –  Ben Bolker Jan 4 '13 at 17:55
    
You are correct arun but I think all the conditions used solve it. You're right that it would be nice to see sample input and output to know for sure. In any event, it's often one of the best strategies to think about in this kind of situation. –  John Jan 4 '13 at 18:34
    
the OP did give a reproducible example, and it only takes 12 seconds to run on my laptop -- so it shouldn't be too hard to check your solution -- it may be useful to know that the result is 4966 rows long. –  Ben Bolker Jan 4 '13 at 18:56
    
But the sample is just random... and independent. For certain, real data does not have this property. So, it's unclear that the best optimization for the random sample is the best one for real data. Furthermore, I didn't provide a solution, just some help in thinking about a solution. –  John Jan 6 '13 at 8:37

I tried to do something clever with vectorization, but failed because previous iterations of the loop can change the data relationships for later iterations through. So I couldn't lag the data by a set amount and compare lagged to real results.

What I can do is minimize the copying operation involved. R is assign-by-copy, so when you write a statement like output.df <- output.df[-loop.del,], you are copying the entire data structure for each row that is deleted. Instead of changing (and copying) the data frame, I made changes to a logical vector. Some other attempts at speed-up include using logical and (&&) instead of bitwise and (&), using %in% to make fewer comparisons, and minimizing accesses on output.df.

To compare the two functions I slightly modified OP solution such that the original data frame was not overwritten. It looks like this can improve speeds by a factor of 10, but it still takes a noticeable about of time (>0.5 sec). I'd love to see any faster solutions.

OP's solution (slightly modified in return value and without global assign)

cutrow.fx <- function(output.df) {
  loop.del <- 2
  while (loop.del <= nrow(output.df)) {
    if ((output.df[loop.del,"action"]=="initial_buy" & 
            output.df[loop.del-1,"action"]=="initial_buy")|
          (output.df[loop.del,"action"]=="sell" & 
            output.df[loop.del-1,"action"]=="sell")|
          (output.df[loop.del,"action"]=="buy" & 
            output.df[loop.del-1,"action"]=="sell")|
          (output.df[loop.del,"action"]=="initial_buy" & 
            output.df[loop.del-1,"action"]=="buy")){
      output.df <- output.df[-loop.del,]
    } else {
      loop.del <- loop.del + 1
    }
  }
return(output.df)
}
ans1 <- cutrow.fx(output.df)

my solution

cutrow.fx2 <- function(output.df) {
    ##edge case if output.df has too few rows
    if (nrow(output.df) < 2) return(output.df)
    ##logical vector of indices of rows to keep
    idx <- c(TRUE,logical(nrow(output.df)-1))
    ##keeps track of the previous row
    prev.row <- 1
    prev.act <- output.df[prev.row,"action"]
    for (current.row in seq_len(nrow(output.df))[-1]) {
        ##access output.df only once per iteration
        current.act <- output.df[current.row,"action"]
        ##checks to see if current row is bad
        ##if so, continue to next row and leave previous row as is
        if ( (prev.act %in% c("initial_buy","buy")) && 
             (current.act == "initial_buy") ) {
            next
        } else if ( (prev.act == "sell") &&
            (current.act %in% c("buy","sell")) ) {
            next
        }
        ##if current row is good, mark it in idx and update previous row
        idx[current.row] <- TRUE
        prev.row <- current.row
        prev.act <- current.act
    }
    return(output.df[idx,])
}
ans2 <- cutrow.fx2(output.df)

checks that answers are the same

identical(ans1,ans2)
## [1] TRUE

#benchmarking
require(microbenchmark)
mb <- microbenchmark(
  ans1=cutrow.fx(output.df)
  ,ans2=cutrow.fx2(output.df),times=50)
print(mb)
# Unit: milliseconds
  # expr       min        lq    median         uq        max
# 1 ans1 9630.1671 9743.1102 9967.6442 10264.7000 12396.5822
# 2 ans2  481.8821  491.6699  500.6126   544.4222   645.9658

plot(mb)
require(ggplot2)
ggplot2::qplot(y=time, data=mb, colour=expr) + ggplot2::scale_y_log10()
share|improve this answer
    
The important thing here (and I did something similar, but without quite as good of results) is to modify a logical vector rather than making copies of the data frame as the function runs. –  Matthew Lundberg Jan 7 '13 at 4:21
    
My machine takes 320ms for your function, which is 1/3 the time taken for my answer. –  Matthew Lundberg Jan 7 '13 at 5:51

Here is some code that is a bit simpler and much faster. It does not loop over all elements, but only loops between matches. It matches forward rather than backward.

First, modify your cutrow.fx function. Remove the <<-output.df on the last line, and simply return the result. Then you can run two functions and compare the results.

cutrow.fx1 <- function(d) {
  len <- length(d[,1])
  o <- logical(len)
  f <- function(a) {
    switch(a,
           initial_buy=c('buy', 'sell'), 
           buy=c('buy', 'sell'),
           sell='initial_buy'
           )
  }
  cur <- 1
  o[cur] <- TRUE
  while (cur < len) {
    nxt <- match(f(d[cur,1]), d[(cur+1):len,1])
    if (all(is.na(nxt))) {
      break
    } else {
      cur <- cur + min(nxt, na.rm=TRUE);
      o[cur] <- TRUE
    }
  }
  d[o,]
}

Show that the results are correct:

identical(cutrow.fx1(output.df), cutrow.fx(output.df))
## [1] TRUE

And it is quite a bit faster. This is due to the partial vectorization of the problem, using match to find the next row to keep, rather than iterating to discard rows.

print(system.time(cutrow.fx(output.df)))
##   user  system elapsed 
##  5.688   0.000   5.720 

print(system.time(cutrow.fx1(output.df)))
##   user  system elapsed 
##  1.050   0.000   1.056 
share|improve this answer

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