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Regardless if it is a good or bad OO practice to provide accessors in a class, I'd like to know if executing access to a specific attribute of an object via reflection decrease performance (memory consumption or cpu time).

Have you implemented this and performed a benchmark? Do you know about anyone who has performed such benchmark?

Edit:

Due to some comments which indicates that it's obvious that performance decrease I've modified the title of the question to indicates that I'd like to know how bad is the impact of implementing accessors with reflection.

Edit:

Thank you for your kind comments and answers. Based on the answer from @Peter Lawrey and the kind comment from @EJP, this is what I meant and wanted to know if any of you have implemented prior to my question:

package co.com.prueba.reflection;

import java.lang.reflect.Field;

public class A {

private String s;


public void setS(String s){
    this.s=s;
}

public String getS(){
    return this.s;
}

public static void main(String[] args) throws IllegalAccessException, NoSuchFieldException {

    System.out.println("Invoking .setAccesible(true) ...");
    A secondA = new A();
    for(int i=0; i<10; i++){
        long start = System.nanoTime();
        Field f = secondA.getClass().getDeclaredField("s");
        f.setAccessible(true);
        f.get(secondA);
        long end = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.println((end - start));
    }

    System.out.println("Without invoking .setAccesible(true) ...");
    A firstA = new A();     
    for(int i=0; i<10; i++){
        long start = System.nanoTime();
        Field f = firstA.getClass().getDeclaredField("s");          
        f.get(firstA);
        long end = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.println((end - start));
    }

    System.out.println("Invoking the getter ...");
    A thirdA = new A();
    for(int i=0; i<10; i++){
        long start = System.nanoTime();
        thirdA.getS();
        long end = System.nanoTime();
        System.out.println((end - start));
    }


}

}

Here are the results:

enter image description here

Thank you all.

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closed as not constructive by dystroy, NPE, EJP, CoolBeans, Jason Towne Jan 4 '13 at 21:26

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3  
Reflection is always slow. –  SLaks Jan 4 '13 at 16:32
3  
Of course it's slower and heavyer than just accessing the variable. And it brings many other problems, like the fact you're compilation doesn't verify the coherency of the accesses. –  dystroy Jan 4 '13 at 16:32
    
What do you mean exactly, accessors (getters and setters) are not reflection. –  Henry Jan 4 '13 at 16:33
    
Please show us some example code, so that we know exactly what you mean. –  NPE Jan 4 '13 at 16:35
1  
Two basic laws of using reflection : 1. The programmer always thinks it's cool. 2. I's almost always a bad idea. –  dystroy Jan 4 '13 at 16:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

On a typical machine the cost of calling a getter via reflection is about 3 ns. A setter is much the same. As a getter can be inlined or even eliminated without reflection there is a high relative difference.

How much difference will 3 ns make to you?

I have supplied a code example and results in my answer HERE yesterday. ;)

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Does it get JIT'ed? –  assylias Jan 4 '13 at 16:47
1  
@assylias Allot but not to the same extent a direct call will. Before the code has warmed up, the cost is closer to 500 ns if you use setAccessible(true) and 1500 ns if you don't) –  Peter Lawrey Jan 4 '13 at 16:49
    
@PeterLawrey this was the base for my implementation. Tks. –  Juan Pablo Jan 4 '13 at 20:51

In order to get just the minimal performance hit that others talk about, be sure to understand that this involves only the reflective call on an already existing Method object. If you do the lookup in every call, the performance hit is huge.

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Java Reflection Performance

It is better than it used to be (I think prior to 1.4) but is still slower than accessing variable directly. I believe it is due to having to load the class and all attributes into memory and then search the list for the one you want.

Accessing a variable directly is recommended (or atleast was) by Google when doing android development to cut out the virtual method call.

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I think this thread answers your question on performance in general. And hope this blog will help you to get some info. on benchmark values. It has some external links such as posts from IBM - Reflection performance benchmark. which discuss about benchmark values.

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