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Background

I have a SQL dataset that is called as a view via LINQ-to-Entities. It's purpose is to provide outstanding account balances on a credit report that are 30 days outstanding, 60 days outstanding, and so on.

Providing for you a sample table is too difficult to format here on StackOverflow, but here is the SQL SELECT statement which should give you an idea of the original data structure:

SELECT TOP 1000 [TransactionId]
      ,[IndustrySector]
      ,[DataContributorId]
      ,[ExperienceMonth]
      ,[ExperienceMonthText]
      ,[Balance]
      ,[ARCurrent]
      ,[AR1to30PD]
      ,[AR31to60PD]
      ,[AR61to90PD]
      ,[Ar91PlusPD]
      ,[WeightedDTP]
  FROM [BCC].[dbo].[vwTransactionExperienceDetail] 

Now, when I call this view via LINQ, the ultimate goal is to construct an object that will be returned as JSON to the requesting client. The resulting object needs to be a hierarchy of groupings by Industry, then by Contributors (of the reported data), and finally of individual Reports. To do this, the following LINQ query works fine and is quite fast:

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets the 25 month experience detail report with summed parameters (balance, DTP, etc).
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="id">The transaction id.</param>
        /// <returns>List&lt;ExperienceDetail&gt;</returns>
        public static List<ExperienceDetail> Get25MonthExperienceDetail_Sum(int id)
        {
            var db = new BCCEntities();
            return
                db.vwTransactionExperienceDetails.Where(te => te.TransactionId == id)
                  .GroupBy(g => g.IndustrySector)
                  .Select(i => new ExperienceDetail
                      {
                          Industry = i.Key,
                          NumberOfContributors = i.GroupBy(c => c.DataContributorId).Count(),
                          Balance = i.Sum(s => s.Balance),
                          OneToThirty = i.Sum(s => s.ARCurrent),
                          ThirtyOneToSixty = i.Sum(s => s.AR1to30PD),
                          SixtyOneToNinety = i.Sum(s => s.AR31to60PD),
                          NinetyOneToOneTwenty = i.Sum(s => s.AR61to90PD),
                          OneTwentyOnePlus = i.Sum(s => s.Ar91PlusPD),
                          DTP = (i.Sum(s => s.Balance) != 0) ? i.Sum(s => s.WeightedDTP) / i.Sum(s => s.Balance) : i.Sum(s => s.WeightedDTP),
                          Contributions = i.GroupBy(dc => dc.DataContributorId).Select(c => new Contribution
                              {
                                  Balance = c.Sum(s => s.Balance),
                                  OneToThirty = c.Sum(s => s.ARCurrent),
                                  ThirtyOneToSixty = c.Sum(s => s.AR1to30PD),
                                  SixtyOneToNinety = c.Sum(s => s.AR31to60PD),
                                  NinetyOneToOneTwenty = c.Sum(s => s.AR61to90PD),
                                  OneTwentyOnePlus = c.Sum(s => s.Ar91PlusPD),
                                  DTP = (c.Sum(s => s.Balance) != 0) ? c.Sum(s => s.WeightedDTP) / c.Sum(s => s.Balance) : c.Sum(s => s.WeightedDTP),
                                  ContributorId = c.Key,
                                  Reports = c.Select(r => new Report
                                  {
                                      DTP = (r.Balance != 0) ? r.WeightedDTP/r.Balance : r.WeightedDTP,
                                      ReportDate = r.ExperienceMonth,
                                      Balance = r.Balance,
                                      OneToThirty = r.ARCurrent,
                                      ThirtyOneToSixty = r.AR1to30PD,
                                      SixtyOneToNinety = r.AR31to60PD,
                                      NinetyOneToOneTwenty = r.AR61to90PD,
                                      OneTwentyOnePlus = r.Ar91PlusPD,
                                      ContributorId = r.DataContributorId,
                                      Industry = i.Key
                                  })
                              })
                      }).ToList();
        }

The Problem

I need to create an additional service that provides the same data, but only for the most recent month reported by each contributor (DataContributorId). The following LINQ query works for this, but is EXTREMELY slow--it takes nearly a full minute to return the results:

        /// <summary>
        /// Gets an experience detail report with summed parameters (balance, DTP, etc) for the most recent month.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="id">The transaction id.</param>
        /// <returns>List&lt;ExperienceDetail&gt;</returns>
        public static List<ExperienceDetail> Get25MonthExperienceDetail_MostRecentMonth(int id)
        {
            var db = new BCCEntities();
            db.CommandTimeout = 100000;
            return
                db.vwTransactionExperienceDetails.Where(te => te.TransactionId == id)
                  .OrderByDescending(o => o.ExperienceMonth)
                  .GroupBy(g => g.IndustrySector)
                  .Select(i => new ExperienceDetail
                  {
                      Industry = i.Key,
                      NumberOfContributors = i.GroupBy(c => c.DataContributorId).Count(),
                      Balance = i.GroupBy(dc => dc.DataContributorId).Sum(x => x.Select(z => z.Balance).FirstOrDefault()),
                      OneToThirty = i.Sum(s => s.ARCurrent),
                      ThirtyOneToSixty = i.Sum(s => s.AR1to30PD),
                      SixtyOneToNinety = i.Sum(s => s.AR31to60PD),
                      NinetyOneToOneTwenty = i.Sum(s => s.AR61to90PD),
                      OneTwentyOnePlus = i.Sum(s => s.Ar91PlusPD),
                      DTP = (i.Sum(s => s.Balance) != 0) ? i.Sum(s => s.WeightedDTP) / i.Sum(s => s.Balance) : i.Sum(s => s.WeightedDTP),
                      Contributions = i.GroupBy(dc => dc.DataContributorId).Select(c => new Contribution
                      {
                          Balance = c.Take(1).Sum(s => s.Balance),
                          OneToThirty = c.Take(1).Sum(s => s.ARCurrent),
                          ThirtyOneToSixty = c.Take(1).Sum(s => s.AR1to30PD),
                          SixtyOneToNinety = c.Take(1).Sum(s => s.AR31to60PD),
                          NinetyOneToOneTwenty = c.Take(1).Sum(s => s.AR61to90PD),
                          OneTwentyOnePlus = c.Take(1).Sum(s => s.Ar91PlusPD),
                          DTP = (c.Take(1).Sum(s => s.Balance) != 0) ? c.Take(1).Sum(s => s.WeightedDTP) / c.Take(1).Sum(s => s.Balance) : c.Take(1).Sum(s => s.WeightedDTP),
                          ContributorId = c.Key,
                          Reports = c.Select(r => new Report
                          {
                              DTP = (r.Balance != 0) ? r.WeightedDTP / r.Balance : r.WeightedDTP,
                              ReportDate = r.ExperienceMonth,
                              Balance = r.Balance,
                              OneToThirty = r.ARCurrent,
                              ThirtyOneToSixty = r.AR1to30PD,
                              SixtyOneToNinety = r.AR31to60PD,
                              NinetyOneToOneTwenty = r.AR61to90PD,
                              OneTwentyOnePlus = r.Ar91PlusPD,
                              ContributorId = r.DataContributorId,
                              Industry = i.Key
                          }).Take(1)
                      })
                  }).ToList();

        }

Question

How do I query for this "Most Recent Month Reported" result set without taking the performance hit? I have tried over the past several hours to isolate the part of the query that is taking the most time and I can't seem to spot it. Admittedly, I don't know how to effectively profile performance issues with complex LINQ queries and am open to comment.

Ultimately the question is: Is there an alternative to this LINQ query that will produce the same result set without such a severe performance penalty?

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
I suspect your OrderByDescending before GroupBy may have something to do with it (and I'm not even sure it will have any effect). Could you test performance without it? – Joachim Isaksson Jan 4 '13 at 16:48
    
I had the same thought and tested but that wasn't the culprit. In fact I took it out altogether and not any significant difference. Thanks though! – Matthew Patrick Cashatt Jan 4 '13 at 16:50
    
I would look in sql profiler what statement is generated. Then I would run it from management studio with execution plan to see what's going on. And then I would rewrite it in plain sql:) Or perhaps add an index somewhere. – ren Jan 4 '13 at 16:58
    
I could imagine, that the problem lies with the Take() calls. The older statement uses sums, which the SQL server statistics might have precomputed already. However, if you want to evaluate a single entry, the SQL server needs to locate that entry and evaluate it each time you call Take(). This is just a guess, so I also recommend what @ren said. – Chris Jan 4 '13 at 17:02
    
Can we see the generated SQL? Your solution may be to avoid table scans with indexes. – Dave Bish Jan 4 '13 at 17:04
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Assuming the dataset is reasonably small, I'd just pull in all the months, go ToList(), then filter out just the most recent month in in memory. LINQ can do some really strange things when the query gets complicated.

share|improve this answer
    
This is actually proving to be the best route: Cache the results of the first query in a variable and then query against that. Thanks! – Matthew Patrick Cashatt Jan 4 '13 at 23:36

On second query you have added:

Balance = i.GroupBy(dc => dc.DataContributorId).Sum(x => x.Select(z => z.Balance).FirstOrDefault()),

and

.OrderByDescending(o => o.ExperienceMonth)

Try to remove groupBy and orderBy to check if are one of them cause performance issue, in this case check (and try) to add index (if none are present) to this columns.

Check also SQL Profiler (if SQL Server 2005 or below) or SQL Extended Events (if SQL Server 2008 or above).

You can try the tools LinqPAD to check the SQL DML produced by the query

There are other methods to get data from database:

  1. Create View on database, and read this from LINQ
  2. Write Entity SQL query
share|improve this answer
    
Good points Max, thanks. I have tried removing both of the chained methods you mention with no success. I believe that I am going to eventually have to resolve this in SQL but I want to leave this question open a bit longer. Thanks again! – Matthew Patrick Cashatt Jan 4 '13 at 17:23
    
Try to replace Take(1) with FirstOrDefault() – Max Jan 4 '13 at 18:18

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