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I need to implement a BST for 2 types of objects; accounts and customers. Both these types have a pk (both called "id"). When I google / reseach for a solution, I can find loads of BST solutions, but they all seem to work with simple types, e.g. the BST solution can sort integers like {1,2,3,4,99,...999} - but I want the BST solution to sort complex types / classes, based on their pk. Is this possible / any tips? Thanks.

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4  
Why don't you just use a std::map (or similar)? – Oliver Charlesworth Jan 4 '13 at 16:59
    
If this is homework, perhaps templates will help. Otherwise, why not use std::map or std::multimap as Oli suggests? – jmucchiello Jan 4 '13 at 17:09
    
What is it that you are actually trying to accomplish? And why a BST? – yasouser Jan 4 '13 at 17:15
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The logic used to build a binary search tree of integers should immediately be generalizable to other data types. Instead of storing an integer as a key in each node, instead store your customer and account names in each field, but when doing lookups only compare the primary key. It really should be that simple.

That said, unless this is for a homework assignment, you should just use std::map, which has all the same complexity guarantees of a binary search tree but is already written for you, widely available, and heavily tested.

Hope this helps!

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One way is to modify you node definition, adding a reference to the object you want to store and set an index (pk in your case), to sort the notes. On using different types, templates might solve:

class Account
{
    public:
        Account(int k) : pk(k) {};
        int pk;
    /* ... */
};


template<typename T>
class TreeNode
{
    public:
        TreeNode(T& the_object) : id(the_object.pk), object(the_object) {};

        int id;
        T& object;
};


int main () {
    Account a(9);
    TreeNode<Account> tn(a);
    std::cout << tn.id;
}

If you want to mix different object types in a tree, the other way is to define a class containing an accessor to the pk attribute and make the account and customer inhere it, for example:

class Indexable
{
    public:
        Indexable(int the_pk) : pk(the_pk) {};
        int pk;
};

class Account : public Indexable
{
    public:
        Account(int k) : Indexable(k) {};
    /* ... */
};

class TreeNode
{
    public:
        TreeNode(Indexable& the_object) : id(the_object.pk), object(the_object) {};

        int id;
        Indexable& object;
};


int main () {
    Account a(9);
    TreeNode tn(a);
    std::cout << tn.id;
}

As the other answers pointed out, in production you might consider using std::map or another known library of tree structures.

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