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I am creating a 'scroll to bottom' news feed that populates news when the user scrolls to the bottom of the page.

I have the following code (via How to check if a user has scrolled to the bottom):

$(window).scroll(function() {
   if($(window).scrollTop() + $(window).height() > $(document).height() - 100) {
       //Ajax Request
   }
});

How can I make sure that a user does not scroll up and then scroll down again before the ajax request is done to populate the news. In other words whats a clean way to pause it until the ajax request is done and has filled in its results

share|improve this question
    
In some implementation you see that the list ends with an UI component, that is either a button (for manual loading) or a loading icon, in case loading is in progress. Then you could quite easily use the state of the UI element as a guidance on whether or not to trigger a new ajax request. Would this fit your UI/UX? – Roonaan Jan 4 '13 at 17:45
2  
@Roonaan - I don't think having your data depend on a UI element is a very good idea. – Joseph Silber Jan 4 '13 at 17:46
    
@Roonaan don't use the DOM to store your state. The DOM is a view, not a datastore. – Halcyon Jan 4 '13 at 17:46
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Something like this:

var request_pending = false;

function at_bottom_of_page() {
    return $(window).scrollTop() + $(window).height() > $(document).height() - 100;
}

$(window).scroll(function() {
    if (request_pending) {
        return;
    }               
    if (at_bottom_of_page()) {
        request_pending = true;
        doAjax(function (moar_news) {
            render_news(moar_news);
            request_pending = false;
        });
    }
});
share|improve this answer

Just use a variable to mark whether an outstanding ajax request is present. If so do not make another request. Else fetch the data. My thinking is that let the user scroll, why to block the UI. In that case it is like making a synchronous call.

var isLoading = false;
//event handler
$(window).scroll(function () {
   // check height..
   // make an ajax request if isLoading is false
   if (!isLoading) {
       $.ajax(/* .. */, success: function () {
           isLoading = false;
       }, 
       error: function () {
           isLoading = false;
       });
       isLoading = true;
   }
}

If you still want to stop listening to event until the ajax response, simply remove the binding in and reattach it in the ajax response handler.

var isLoading = false;
addScrollEvent();

function scrollHandler(e) {
   // check height..
   // make an ajax request if isLoading is false
   if (!isLoading) {
       $.ajax(/* .. */, success: function () {
           isLoading = false;
           addScrollEvent();
       }, 
       error: function () {
           isLoading = false;
           addScrollEvent();
       });
       $(window).off('scroll', scrollHandler);
   }
}

function addScrollEvent() {
    $(window).on('scroll', scrollHandler);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Code example would be useful, though. – hayavuk Jan 4 '13 at 17:52

Before making the AJAX request, unbind the scroll handler. After you've processed the AJAX response, rebind the scroll handler. You'll want to give the scroll handler a name to enable unbinding and rebinding:

$(window).scroll(function scrollHandler() {
    if($(window).scrollTop() + $(window).height() > $(document).height() - 100) {
        $(window).off("scroll", scrollHandler);
        $.ajax({
            ...
            complete: function() {
                $(window).scroll(scrollHandler);
            }
        });
    }
});
share|improve this answer

Not an answer as such, but a note that doesn't fit well in a comment.

For IE6/IE7/IE8 the .scroll doesn't really perform well and will call your callback dozens (if not hundreds) of times in each scroll. In our projects we use a wrapper function called .detachedScroll to prevent this behavior:

/**
* Detached scroll prevents freezing in IE<=8
*/
if($.browser.msie && parseInt($.browser.version, 10) <= 8) {
    $.fn.scrollDetached = function(callback) {
        return $(this).each(function() {
            var oThis = this;
            clearInterval(this.detachedScrollInterval);
            this.detachedScrollInterval = setInterval(function() {
                if (oThis.hasScrolled) {
                    oThis.hasScrolled = false;
                    // Calling detached scrolling callback
                    callback();
                }
            }, 500);
            $(this).scroll(function() {
                // There was a scrolling event
                oThis.hasScrolled = true;
            });
        });
    };
} else {
    $.fn.scrollDetached = $.fn.scroll;
}
share|improve this answer

You can use .off() to remove event handlers.

var attachEvent = function(){

    $(window).scroll(function() {

        $(window).off("scroll");
        $.ajax("example.php").done(function() { 

            //If you want to reattach event
            attachEvent(); 
        });            
    });
};

attachEvent(); 
share|improve this answer

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