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How to read an array of integers with unknown length from a file? I don't see a way to get the size of the array, so I tried some temporary-string-stuff, but my code explodes...

any better ideas?

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3  
try using std::vector<std::string> or std::vector<int> –  sgarizvi Jan 4 '13 at 17:56
2  
@GuySirton, stackoverflow.com/questions/5605125/… –  chris Jan 4 '13 at 17:59
1  
@GuySirton: That's absolutely terrible advice. eof is just almost never correct. –  Kerrek SB Jan 4 '13 at 18:01
    
@KerrekSB: It's pseudo-code, as is continue doing this until you run out of data. I see your point how this can be wrong/confusing, the point was just to illustrate keep reading and push into a vector while you have something to read (yes the actual code would differ). –  Guy Sirton Jan 4 '13 at 18:05
    
As an aside, if the file consists only of integers and you want all of them, you can get the number by getting the file size and dividing by sizeof(int). –  Useless Jan 4 '13 at 18:06

1 Answer 1

Use std::vector:

std::ifstream inFile(fileName);

std::vector<int> ints{
    std::istream_iterator<int>(inFile),
    std::istream_iterator<int>()
};

std::vector provides dynamic storage, so it resizes as needed to fit what it holds. All I do is utilize the constructor that takes a pair of iterators and loops through them, beginning to end, and copies the values into the vector. The iterators I'm using will read integers from the file until one can't, as is the case when the end of file is reached. I also use uniform initialization to avoid the most vexing parse, an easy mistake to make when using this form of the constructor.

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4  
This suffers from the most vexing parse. ints is a function declaration. –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 4 '13 at 18:05
    
@BenjaminLindley, Oops, one second. –  chris Jan 4 '13 at 18:05
    
Personally, I've always found this more readable, and less typing: std::istream_iterator<int> in_begin(inFile), in_end; std::vector<int> ints(in_begin, in_end); –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 4 '13 at 18:06
1  
C++03 MVP elimination: add extra parens around first argument: std::vector<int> ints((std::istream_iterator<int>(infile)), std::istream_iterator<int>());. –  Jerry Coffin Jan 4 '13 at 18:07
1  
And std::ifstream inFile(...); is also a function declaration. </nitpick> :) –  jrok Jan 4 '13 at 18:12

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