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I have a QImage and I need to trim the surrounding white (i.e. crop it to only the non-white area).

Does QImage or QPixmap have a built-in function that will return the bounding box of the non-white area of an image, similar to QGraphicsPixmapItem::opaqueArea()? Meaning, no non-white pixels are outside of that bounding box.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't see a built in function for this but it should be easy enough to make your own like this:

QRect getBoundsWithoutColor(QImage qImage, const Qcolor &exclusionColor = Qt:white)
{
    QRect ofTheKing;

    int maxX = 0; int minX = qImage.width;
    int maxY = 0; int minY = qImage.height;

    for(int x=0; x < qImage.width(); x++)
        for(int y=0; y < qImage.height(); y++)
            if (QColor.fromRgb(qImage.pixel(x, y)) != exclusionColor)
            {
                if(x < minX) minX = x;
                if(x > maxX) maxX = x;
                if(y < minY) minY = y;
                if(y > maxY) maxY = y;
            }

    if (minX > maxX || minY > maxY)
        // The whole picture is white. How you wanna handle this case is up to you.
    else
        ofTheKing.setCoords(minX, minY, maxX+1, maxY+1);

    return ofTheKing;
 }
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There is no such function built into QImage, but since QImage allows direct access to the pixel data, it shouldn't be too hard to code yourself. On the top of my head, it would probably look something like this.

const QRgb CROP_COLOR = QColor(Qt::white).rgb();

QImage crop(const QImage& image)
{
    QRect croppedRegion(0, 0, image.width(), image.height());

    // Top
    for (int row = 0; row < image.height(); row++) {
        for (int col = 0; col < image.width(); col++) {
            if (image.pixel(col, row) != CROP_COLOR) {
                croppedRegion.setTop(row);
                row = image.height();
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    // Bottom
    for (int row = image.height() - 1; row >= 0; row--) {
        for (int col = 0; col < image.width(); col++) {
            if (image.pixel(col, row) != CROP_COLOR) {
                croppedRegion.setBottom(row);
                row = -1;
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    // Left
    for (int col = 0; col < image.width(); col++) {
        for (int row = 0; row < image.height(); row++) {
            if (image.pixel(col, row) != CROP_COLOR) {
                croppedRegion.setLeft(col);
                col = image.width();
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    // Right
    for (int col = image.width(); col >= 0; col--) {
        for (int row = 0; row < image.height(); row++) {
            if (image.pixel(col, row) != CROP_COLOR) {
                croppedRegion.setRight(col);
                col = -1;
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    return image.copy(croppedRegion);
}

Disclaimer : This code can probably be optimized. I haven't tested it, it looks like it compiles but there might be a typo somewhere. I just put it there to show the general idea.

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