Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I get this date in javascript from an rss-feed (atom):

2009-09-02T07:35:00+00:00

If I try Date.parse on it, I get NaN.

How can I parse this into a date, so that I can do date-stuff to it?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is my code, with test cases:

function myDateParser(datestr) {
var yy   = datestr.substring(0,4);
var mo   = datestr.substring(5,7);
var dd   = datestr.substring(8,10);
var hh   = datestr.substring(11,13);
var mi   = datestr.substring(14,16);
var ss   = datestr.substring(17,19);
var tzs  = datestr.substring(19,20);
var tzhh = datestr.substring(20,22);
var tzmi = datestr.substring(23,25);
var myutc = Date.UTC(yy-0,mo-1,dd-0,hh-0,mi-0,ss-0);
var tzos = (tzs+(tzhh * 60 + tzmi * 1)) * 60000;
return new Date(myutc-tzos);
}


javascript:alert(myDateParser("2009-09-02T07:35:00+00:00"))
javascript:alert(myDateParser("2009-09-02T07:35:00-04:00"))
javascript:alert(myDateParser("2009-12-25T18:08:20-05:00"))
javascript:alert(myDateParser("2010-03-17T22:30:00+10:30").toGMTString())
share|improve this answer

maybe this question can help you.

if you use jquery this can be useful too

share|improve this answer

You can convert that date into a format that javascript likes easily enough. Just remove the 'T' and everything after the '+':

var val = '2009-09-02T07:35:00+00:00',
    date = new Date(val.replace('T', ' ').split('+')[0]);

Update: If you need to compensate for the timezone offset then you can do this:

var val = '2009-09-02T07:35:00-06:00',
    matchOffset = /([+-])(\d\d):(\d\d)$/,
    offset = matchOffset.exec(val),
    date = new Date(val.replace('T', ' ').replace(matchOffset, ''));
offset = (offset[1] == '+' ? -1 : 1) * (offset[2] * 60 + Number(offset[3]));
date.setMinutes(date.getMinutes() + offset - date.getTimezoneOffset());
share|improve this answer
1  
How can you remove everything after "+" if it denotes timezone offset? Shouldn't resulting date be adjusted appropriately? –  kangax Sep 13 '09 at 4:35
    
It depends on how he intends to use it, but that is a good point. –  Prestaul Sep 13 '09 at 6:57
    
Living in +00:00 timezone has its advantages. ;) –  Kjensen Sep 13 '09 at 11:34
    
I don't think this would work because "val" minus the "T" and everything after the "+" is still not a valid date string, you'd need to replace the "-"s with "/"s too. Also the second replace cant work because "matchOffset" is an array, "replace(matchOffset[0], '')" would work though. –  Jonathon Oates Nov 29 '10 at 15:46
    
@Jonathon, I assure you that it does work. The Date constructor can handle a wide variety of input formats, and matchOffset is not an array, it is a regular expression. –  Prestaul Dec 7 '10 at 21:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.