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I am fairly new to working with collections so please bear with me my jargon might not even be accurate.

I have PetaPoco returning query results as an IEnumerable, one collection for each result. I want to evaluate the collections to get a specific string from a specific field in each collection. So far I am able to iterate the Enumerable and seeming able to get access an object as per my snippet below but when i view c.Language in debug, it is only the first character of the string (eg where c.Language should equal "JPY" it equals only "J")

am I doing this completely wrong? Thanks for the advice

public void AddContactOrder(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        IEnumerable OrderFact = new OrdersFactsController().getOrderFacts(base.ModuleId);
        IEnumerator enumerator = OrderFact.GetEnumerator();
        var test = "";
        List<string> lang = new List<string>();
        while (enumerator.MoveNext())
        {

            OrderFact c = (OrderFact)enumerator.Current;
            if (c.Language == "JPY")
            {
                test = "okay";
            }

        }

}

getorderFacts() returns an IEnumerable where T is OrderFact

public class OrderFact
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public int ModuleId { get; set; }
    public string ProdCode { get; set; }
    public string Language { get; set; }
    public string Currency { get; set; }
    public string KeyCodes { get; set; }
    public string OrderSourceCode { get; set; }
    public string OfferingCode { get; set; }
    public string JobNumber { get; set; }
    public DateTime CreatedDate { get; set; }
    public DateTime ModifiedDate { get; set; }
}
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Can you inspect the value of c and c.Language by debugging and see the expected values in there? –  Jon Peterson Jan 4 '13 at 19:01
4  
Side note: do you really want to do iteration by hand? foreach or even better LINQ .Where would look much shorter/less chance for errors. –  Alexei Levenkov Jan 4 '13 at 19:02
1  
@AlexeiLevenkov It looks like he wants Any, not Where, but yeah. Also, the IEnumerator isn't being disposed and he should almost certainly be using IEnumerable<OrderFact> and not just IEnumerable. –  Servy Jan 4 '13 at 19:04
2  
Does getOrderFacts() return a string by any chance? If so, you're enumerating its char[], and hence the first value is "J" instead of "JPY". –  Jon B Jan 4 '13 at 19:04
1  
Seems I am mostly to blame here. The code above did work I was just testing against the wrong field. "JPY" is result for c.Currency. c.Language correct result is actually "J". but I did learn a much more efficient way to do things thanks to suggestions and examples using LINQ statements. Thanks again you guys are awesome! –  Mark Hollas Jan 4 '13 at 19:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You're better off just using a foreach loop:

foreach (var c in new OrdersFactsController().getOrderFacts(base.ModuleID))
{
    if (c.Language == "JPY")
        test = "okay";
}
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You could use System.Linq's Any extension method:

public void AddContactOrder(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var orderFacts = new OrdersFactsController().getOrderFacts(base.ModuleId);
    var test = orderFacts.Any(x => x.Language == "JPY") ? "okay" : "";

}
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    public void AddContactOrder(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        IEnumerable<OrderFact> orderFacts = new OrdersFactsController().getOrderFacts(base.ModuleId);
        var test = "";
        if(orderFacts.Any(x => x.Language == "JPY")) test="okay";
    }

LINQ!

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