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I am looking for a solution to the following problem:

Given an array "a" and an array "b", find a set of operations, which when applied to "a", transforms "a" into "b".

So for example, given that I have:

a = [1,2,3]
b = [3,2,4]
c = transmute(a, b)

I would now expect c to contain something like:

[["remove", 0], ["add", 2, 4], ["swap", 0, 1]]

Adding these operations on "a", in the given order, should produce "b":

[1,2,3] => [2,3] => [2,3,4] => [3,2,4]

Here's a very naive implementation in Ruby: https://gist.github.com/4455256. This one assumes that there are no duplicates in the array (which is not a good assumption). It's also O(n²), I think, and it would be nice if there were something more performant.

Is there any known algorithm which does this? Any further reading I can do? Do you have any suggestions on how this could be improved?

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It's quite similar to edit distance. I think you can do better than yours with a modification of the Levenshtein algorithm. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 4 '13 at 19:50
    
I don't know that there's a polynomial-time algorithm for this. See this related question. –  Ted Hopp Jan 4 '13 at 19:54
    
So far the problem appears to be a adding between a vector and a constant vector that would result in another vector. I think I don't fully understand the problem, so please bring some explanation. –  user1929959 Jan 4 '13 at 19:54
    
Unfortunately Levenshtein doesn't work for my particular use case, because it cannot move elements. In the example I wrote, it would not have been able to figure ut that it just needed to swap "2" and "3", instead it would have removed one of them and then added it again. –  jnicklas Jan 4 '13 at 19:54
    
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3 Answers

You can proceed in stages to solve this problem. According to what I have thought, there should be 3 stages. An O(N) solution will be possible.

Copy array A into array C and array B into array D.

  1. Now, compare the 2 arrays C & D. Remove the elements in C that are not present in D. These are the elements that need to be removed from array A. If we use a HashMap for this step, then it can be done in O(N)
  2. Compare C and D again, remove elements in D that are not in C. These elements will essentially be the elements that we will add into array A.
  3. So, now we have 2 arrays - C & D which essentially have the same elements. We only need to see how we can swap these elements in order to make them look alike.
  4. Once they look alike, we can add the missing elements from A into D. Add back the elements that you had removed in step 2 into array D. They can be added in the correct order by comparison with original array A.

Since, steps 1,2,4 are fairly simple to do. I will explain how to come with the order of swaps. Lets take an example. If currently our array C looks like 1,3,2 and D looks like 3,2,1. We compare value at each index in D with the corresponding value in C. If they are different then we mark a directed edge from element in C to element in D. So, at index 0, C has 1 and D has 3. They are different,hence we draw a directed edge from 1 to 3. 1->3. Similarly we draw an edge from 3 to 2 for index 1. And an edge from 2 to 1 for index 2.

This leads us to a DAG. You can try various things like DFS and see, I'll just state the result here. The no. of swaps will be ( No. of nodes in the graph - 1 ). The DFS traversal of the graph will tell the order in which the swaps will occur.

Note: If there are duplicate elements in the arrays, then a little more book-keeping will be required but the same solution will work.

If you are not able to swapping stage of the algorithm via a DAG. Please look at the question quoted by @handcraftsman, which is string transposition algorithm. It presents a similar approach to the same problem.

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This answer may be useful: string transposition algorithm

Take a look at edit-distance algorithms

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here's one solution:

get the token-index pairs of all tokens in the source string
get the token-index pairs of all tokens in the target string

from both sets remove the values that are in the other set.

foreach token-index in the source set
   if the target set has the token at the same location
      remove it from both sets, this is a match created by a previous swap
   get the target token at the source index
   if the source set has the target token (at any index)
      create a swap command to swap the source token at source index with
         the target token at its index in the source
      remove the token-index from the source set
      remove the target token-index from the target set
      add a token-index for the target token at the new index to the source set
      loop without moving to the next token-index

create remove commands for any remaining token-indexes in the source set
create add commands for any remaining token-indexes in the target set

here's a quick C# implementation:

private static IEnumerable<ICommand> GetChangeCommands(string source, string target)
{
    var unmatchedSourceTokens = GetUnmatchedTokenIndexes(source, target);
    var unmatchedTargetTokens = GetUnmatchedTokenIndexes(target, source);

    var commands = new List<ICommand>();

    foreach (var tokenIndexList in unmatchedSourceTokens)
    {
        var sourceToken = tokenIndexList.Key;
        var sourceStringSourceTokenIndexes = unmatchedSourceTokens[sourceToken];

        foreach (var sourceLoopIndex in tokenIndexList.Value.ToList())
        {
            var sourceIndex = sourceLoopIndex;
            bool swapped;
            do
            {
                swapped = false;
                if (sourceIndex >= target.Length)
                {
                    continue;
                }
                var targetToken = target[sourceIndex];
                if (targetToken == sourceToken)
                {
                    sourceStringSourceTokenIndexes.Remove(sourceIndex);
                    unmatchedTargetTokens[targetToken].Remove(sourceIndex);
                    continue;
                }
                List<int> sourceStringTargetTokenIndexes;
                if (!unmatchedSourceTokens.TryGetValue(targetToken, out sourceStringTargetTokenIndexes) ||
                    !sourceStringTargetTokenIndexes.Any())
                {
                    continue;
                }
                var targetIndex = sourceStringTargetTokenIndexes.First();
                commands.Add(new SwapCommand(sourceIndex, targetIndex));
                sourceStringTargetTokenIndexes.RemoveAt(0);
                sourceStringSourceTokenIndexes.Remove(sourceIndex);
                sourceStringSourceTokenIndexes.Add(targetIndex);
                unmatchedTargetTokens[targetToken].Remove(sourceIndex);
                swapped = true;
                sourceIndex = targetIndex;
            } while (swapped);
        }
    }

    var removalCommands = unmatchedSourceTokens
        .SelectMany(x => x.Value)
        .Select(x => new RemoveCommand(x))
        .Cast<ICommand>()
        .OrderByDescending(x => x.Index)
        .ToList();

    commands.AddRange(removalCommands);

    var insertCommands = unmatchedTargetTokens
        .SelectMany(x => x.Value.Select(y => new InsertCommand(y, x.Key)))
        .Cast<ICommand>()
        .OrderBy(x => x.Index)
        .ToList();

    commands.AddRange(insertCommands);

    return commands;
}

private static IDictionary<char, List<int>> GetUnmatchedTokenIndexes(string source, string target)
{
    var targetTokenIndexes = target.Select((x, i) => new
                                                            {
                                                                Token = x,
                                                                Index = i
                                                            })
                                    .ToLookup(x => x.Token, x => x.Index)
                                    .ToDictionary(x => x.Key, x => x.ToList());

    var distinctSourceTokenIndexes = new Dictionary<char, List<int>>();
    foreach (var tokenInfo in source.Select((x, i) => new
                                                            {
                                                                Token = x,
                                                                Index = i
                                                            }))
    {
        List<int> indexes;
        if (!targetTokenIndexes.TryGetValue(tokenInfo.Token, out indexes) ||
            !indexes.Contains(tokenInfo.Index))
        {
            if (!distinctSourceTokenIndexes.TryGetValue(tokenInfo.Token, out indexes))
            {
                indexes = new List<int>();
                distinctSourceTokenIndexes.Add(tokenInfo.Token, indexes);
            }
            indexes.Add(tokenInfo.Index);
        }
    }
    return distinctSourceTokenIndexes;
}

internal class InsertCommand : ICommand
{
    private readonly char _token;

    public InsertCommand(int index, char token)
    {
        Index = index;
        _token = token;
    }

    public int Index { get; private set; }

    public string Change(string input)
    {
        var chars = input.ToList();
        chars.Insert(Index, _token);
        return new string(chars.ToArray());
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return string.Format("[\"add\", {0}, '{1}']", Index, _token);
    }
}

internal class RemoveCommand : ICommand
{
    public RemoveCommand(int index)
    {
        Index = index;
    }

    public int Index { get; private set; }

    public string Change(string input)
    {
        var chars = input.ToList();
        chars.RemoveAt(Index);
        return new string(chars.ToArray());
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return string.Format("[\"remove\", {0}]", Index);
    }
}

internal class SwapCommand : ICommand
{
    private readonly int _targetIndex;

    public SwapCommand(int sourceIndex, int targetIndex)
    {
        Index = sourceIndex;
        _targetIndex = targetIndex;
    }

    public int Index { get; private set; }

    public string Change(string input)
    {
        var chars = input.ToArray();
        var temp = chars[Index];
        chars[Index] = chars[_targetIndex];
        chars[_targetIndex] = temp;
        return new string(chars);
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return string.Format("[\"swap\", {0}, {1}]", Index, _targetIndex);
    }
}

internal interface ICommand
{
    int Index { get; }
    string Change(string input);
}

sample usage:

const string source = "123";
const string target = "324";
var commands = GetChangeCommands(source, target);
Execute(source, target, commands);

private static void Execute(string current, string target, IEnumerable<ICommand> commands)
{
    Console.WriteLine("converting".PadRight(19) + current + " to " + target);
    foreach (var command in commands)
    {
        Console.Write(command.ToString().PadRight(15));
        Console.Write(" => ");
        current = command.Change(current);
        Console.WriteLine(current);
    }
}

sample output:

converting         123 to 324
["swap", 0, 2]  => 321
["remove", 2]   => 32
["add", 2, '4'] => 324

converting         hello to world
["swap", 1, 4]  => holle
["remove", 4]   => holl
["remove", 2]   => hol
["remove", 0]   => ol
["add", 0, 'w'] => wol
["add", 2, 'r'] => worl
["add", 4, 'd'] => world

converting         something to smith
["swap", 1, 2]  => smoething
["swap", 2, 6]  => smiethong
["swap", 3, 4]  => smitehong
["swap", 4, 5]  => smitheong
["remove", 8]   => smitheon
["remove", 7]   => smitheo
["remove", 6]   => smithe
["remove", 5]   => smith

converting         something to sightseeing
["swap", 1, 6]  => simethong
["swap", 6, 3]  => simotheng
["swap", 3, 5]  => simhtoeng
["swap", 2, 8]  => sightoenm
["remove", 8]   => sightoen
["remove", 7]   => sightoe
["remove", 5]   => sighte
["add", 5, 's'] => sightse
["add", 7, 'e'] => sightsee
["add", 8, 'i'] => sightseei
["add", 9, 'n'] => sightseein
["add", 10, 'g'] => sightseeing

here are some inefficiencies evident in the samples above: it swaps tokens that are going to be removed it removes and then re-adds tokens

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