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So I m a little confused about how linked list works and how do they keep reference in C++.

For example I got a list lets say myList and I want to print its items.
I know from school that i have to copy my list to another list to keep myList the same after printing process.

Node* n;
n = myList;
while(n)
{
    printf("%d ",n->val);
    n=n->next;
}

OK so I have a copy of myList in another list n(with same pointers). After I loop through n , myList is the same but had same pointers like n.

If n changes why myList didn't change(same pointers,right?)?

Now if I say:

Node* n;
n = myList;
n->next = NULL;//or n->next=another node -doesn t matter

Now in the second example myList was changed too.

Can you explain this to me?

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3  
Which language, C or C++? –  David Heffernan Jan 4 '13 at 19:46
2  
The printing process has no deals modifying the list, you shouldn't need to do anything to keep it the same –  K-ballo Jan 4 '13 at 19:46
    
@DavidHeffernan both –  Sergiu Craitoiu Jan 4 '13 at 19:48
    
How can it be both? You are writing code that will be compiled twice? Once by a C compiler, and once by a C++ compiler? –  David Heffernan Jan 4 '13 at 19:50
    
@DavidHeffernan his question applies to C and the C subset of C++. Both have linked lists and pointers. –  Seth Carnegie Jan 4 '13 at 19:50
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You haven't created a separate list, nor have you modified your original list; you've simply iterated through the list using n to point to each element in turn (sort of like indexing through an array).

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Thank you dear sir:D –  Sergiu Craitoiu Jan 4 '13 at 20:34
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I think you have some confusion about the difference between the actual list structure, and references to the list structure.

In your first example, about traversing the list, you basically have this situation before traversing, where you have two references to the same list:

o-->o-->o-->o-->o-->NULL
^
|
 \_ myList, n

which looks like this after you traverse the list:

o-->o-->o-->o-->o-->NULL
^                   ^
|                   |
 \_ myList           \_ n

If you didn't make a copy of the reference to the head of the list to traverse it, you would end up with this after traversing:

o-->o-->o-->o-->o-->NULL
                    ^
                    |
                     \_ myList

Because you no longer have a pointer to the head of your list, you are unable to access the list.

In your second example, you have this:

o-->o-->o-->o-->o-->NULL
^
|
 \_ myList, n

And you transform it into this:

  _________________
 /                 \
o   o-->o-->o-->o-->NULL
^
|
 \_ myList, n

That transformations changes the actual structure of the list, which will be reflected in all references to that list.

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2  
+1 for ASCII art :) –  Alter Mann Jan 4 '13 at 19:58
2  
+1 I LIKE PICTURES –  Mooing Duck Jan 4 '13 at 19:59
2  
+1 for getting to the root of the poster's confusion quickly. Also for the AsCII art. –  Nik Bougalis Jan 4 '13 at 19:59
2  
Wow, I'm going to have to start doing ASCII art more often :) –  Gordon Bailey Jan 4 '13 at 20:04
    
Nicely explained –  exex zian Jan 4 '13 at 20:11
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If you change the pointer n, it is not going to be the same value as the pointer mylist ... they are two separate pointers that initially point to the same object because you generated the initial value of n from a copy of the value in mylist.

That being said, if you have not adjusted the value of n since its initialization from the value in mylist, then the two pointers are pointing to the same object. Should you dereference either pointer and modify the object they are pointing to, then both pointers, since they are pointing to the same object, will reflect the changes to that object being pointed to.

In the end, because you are simply copying the value of mylist into n, there is only a single linked-list ... you did not make a "deep" copy of the list. So if you modify the actual list node being pointed to by either of the pointers, then the actual list will be modified.

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n = myList; makes n point to the same element as myList. They are essentially the same - other than you can re-assign n, but as they point to the same location, you haven't really made a copy of the list - just a copy of a pointer to the first node.

Because they point to the same location, n->next = NULL; will modify both lists.

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