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I have some files named like this:

file1.c.keep.apple

file2.c.keep.apple

I am trying to write a shell script so that I pass in the suffix as an argument (in this case, apple) and it will rename all of the files removing the .keep.apple.

Example execution:

script.sh apple

results in the files above being renamed to

file1.c

file2.c

So far, I have

 #! /bin/sh
 find . -type f -name \'*.keep.$1\' -print0 | xargs -0 rename 's/\(.keep.*)$//'

and the files do not get renamed. I know the find portion is correct. I am thinking the regex on my rename is wrong. How can I get the script working the way I want?

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Does it need to be done recursively through several sub directories? –  jesse_galley Jan 4 '13 at 19:52
    
yes, sorry. I want it to work when I execute this script from a directory, and it searches the current dir and all subdirs. –  unexpected62 Jan 4 '13 at 19:58
    
Check my edited answer, it seems to do what you want. –  jesse_galley Jan 4 '13 at 20:12
    
Updated my answer again based on your needs and comments made by Uwe Kleine-König. You should review the answers and comments again! –  jesse_galley Jan 4 '13 at 20:32
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Updated, try this perhaps:

#!/bin/bash

SUFFIX=$1;

find . -type f -name "*keep.${SUFFIX}" | while read -r file;
do 
    nfile=`echo $file | sed "s/\.keep\.${SUFFIX}//g"`; 
    mv "$file" "$nfile" 2>/dev/null; 
done

here it is running:

jgalley@jgalley-debian:/test5$ cat replace.sh 
#!/bin/bash

SUFFIX=$1;

find . -type f -name "*keep.${SUFFIX}" | while read -r file;
do 
    nfile=`echo $file | sed "s/\.keep\.${SUFFIX}//g"`; 
    mv "$file" "$nfile" 2>/dev/null; 
done
jgalley@jgalley-debian:/test5$ find .
.
./-filewithadash.keep.apple
./dir1
./dir1/file
./dir1/file2.keep.orange
./dir2
./dir2/file2
./file with spaces
./file.keep.orange
./file.keep.somethingelse.apple
./file.orange
./replace.sh
jgalley@jgalley-debian:/test5$ ./replace.sh apple
jgalley@jgalley-debian:/test5$ find .
.
./-filewithadash
./dir1
./dir1/file
./dir1/file2.keep.orange
./dir2
./dir2/file2
./file with spaces
./file.keep.orange
./file.keep.somethingelse.apple
./file.orange
./replace.sh
jgalley@jgalley-debian:/test5$ 
share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't address the ".keep" part but uses "file" instead, though. Also note that this doesn't work if the filenames contain spaces (which might or might not be important) –  Uwe Kleine-König Jan 4 '13 at 19:59
    
Oh, right. Yeah I've fixed both of those things. –  jesse_galley Jan 4 '13 at 20:11
    
I didn't test, but I'd say you need sed "s/.keep.${SUFFIX}//". And this is still broken as . is special. –  Uwe Kleine-König Jan 4 '13 at 20:15
    
I changed the find command to be "*.keep.$1" and the sed to be "s/.keep.${SUFFIX}//g" and its working for me!! –  unexpected62 Jan 4 '13 at 20:19
1  
@unexpected62: you want to quote the dots and add a $ at the end for the sed expression, yielding: s/\.keep\.${SUFFIX}$//. Otherwise you will have funny results on filenames like file.keep.applepie.keep.apple. –  Uwe Kleine-König Jan 4 '13 at 20:24
show 4 more comments

I know the find portion is correct

Except it isn't.

find . -type f -name "*.keep.$1" -print0 | ...
share|improve this answer
    
I had it as \'*.keep.$1\' so that the $1 was recognized as an argument. With your solution isn't it going to look for the string literal $1 in the filename? –  unexpected62 Jan 4 '13 at 19:58
2  
No, it isn't. And as an added bonus it won't let spaces in $1 destroy your system. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 4 '13 at 19:59
    
Oh, interesting. Thanks. Regardless, the xargs portion must be wrong because the script still doesn't work with your change. –  unexpected62 Jan 4 '13 at 20:02
1  
Your parens are unbalanced. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jan 4 '13 at 20:03
    
With \'*.keep.$1\' you search for files who's name start with '. –  Uwe Kleine-König Jan 4 '13 at 20:04
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I'd say you need:

find . -type f -name "*.keep.$1" -print0 | xargs -0 rename "s/\.keep\.$1$//"

Note the following limitations:

  • rename might not be available everywhere.
  • find -print0 and xargs -0 are GNU extensions which might not be available on all Unixes.
  • if your first parameter contains characters that are special for regexes the result might not what you want. (e.g. yourscript "a*e")
share|improve this answer
    
This actually didn't work for me... –  unexpected62 Jan 4 '13 at 20:16
    
@unexpected62: hmm, works for me (even before I made the command more robust with some edits after your comment). I did: mkdir adir; touch adir/file2.c.keep.apple; touch file1.c.keep.apple; set apple; find . -type f -name "*.keep.$1" -print0 | xargs -0 rename "s/\.keep\.$1$//" –  Uwe Kleine-König Jan 4 '13 at 20:27
    
what does $1 stand for in your scripts –  Registered User Mar 9 '13 at 5:56
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If you can assume bash, and a version of bash greater then 4 (with globstar support), here is a clean bash-only solution:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

(($#)) || exit 1

shopt -s globstar nullglob
for f in **/*.keep."$1"; do
    mv -- "$f" "${f%.keep.$1}"
done

Alternatively, here is a solution using find and a while read loop (assumes GNU or BSD find):

find . -type f -name "*.keep.$1" -print0 | while IFS= read -r -d '' f; do
    mv -- "$f" "${f%.keep.$1}"
done

See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/030 for more details on this solution.

Also, you can implement what you are trying to do using find with -exec:

find . -type f -name "*.keep.$1" -exec sh -c 'mv -- "$2" "${2%.keep.$1}"' _ "$1" {} ';'
share|improve this answer
    
In the last find solution: in the exec statement, you probably mean bash -c 'mv -- "$1" "${1%.keep.$0}"' "$1" {}. And it fails in some ways if either $1 is * or if $1 is ; –  gniourf_gniourf Jan 5 '13 at 20:58
    
No, I meant what I typed. The only differences between what I wrote and what you had suggested is the use of 'bash', and a shift of the positional parameters. 'bash' is not necessary, since POSIX sh supports parameter expansion; your shift of positional parameters is not necessary, nor relevant. And, in fact, including '*' characters in the suffix works just fine, since the shell does not do glob expansion when arguments are inside double quotes. –  Josh Cartwright Jan 5 '13 at 21:39
    
I came across this solution while searching on net for some thing I am not clear with use of 'mv -- "$2" "${2%.keep.$1}"' what does ${2%.keep.$1} and $2 stand for and use of underscore in your solution "$1" {} and then use of ';' what kind of syntax is this –  Registered User Mar 9 '13 at 6:00
    
${2%.keep.$1} is a parameter expansion (see the bash man page); this PE expands to the value of $2 with the suffix .keep.$1 removed ($1 is expanded here before the removal). To better understand how $1 and $2 are set here, it helps to understand how sh -c works. sh -c 'echo "$1"' _ "hello, world!" , for example, will spawn a shell to run the 'echo "$1"' command string, and set the positional arguments to: $0 = _; $1 = "hello, world!" (the underscore is there as a placeholder for $0). The rest is wrapping this all up with find. Hope that helps! –  Josh Cartwright Mar 10 '13 at 15:55
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How about this?

[spatel@us tmp]$ x=aa.bb.cc
[spatel@us tmp]$ y=${x%.cc}
[spatel@us tmp]$ echo $y
aa.bb


[spatel@us tmp]$ x=aa.bb.cc
[spatel@us tmp]$ y=${x%.bb.cc}
[spatel@us tmp]$ echo $y
aa
share|improve this answer
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Shorter:

shopt -s globstar
rename 's/\.keep\.apple$//' **/*.keep.apple

(require perl)

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