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I have the following html:

        <ul id="contain">
         <li class="active_one"></li>
         <li class="two"></li>
        </ul>

And the following jquery:

$contain = $('#contain'); //going to use a lot

$contain.on('click','li.two', function(){
                console.log('working');
                //plus do other stuff
                });

The above does not work, but When I change it to:

$('body').on('click','li.two', function(){
                    console.log('working');
                    //plus do other stuff
                    });

Then it works, but I know the best practice is to drill as close as possible to the parent element of what I am trying to work with, yet every time I try to do that, I am clearly doing something wrong because my parent level selectors are not working.

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3  
Your first example works fine. jsfiddle.net/Sk6Jp –  jbabey Jan 4 '13 at 20:20
    
It doesn't for me. (Firefox) –  Dylan Cross Jan 4 '13 at 20:21
    
Most likely #contain doesn't exist or is being overwritten when you update the list. –  Kevin B Jan 4 '13 at 20:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It means that #contain itself is not a static element, you should select closest static parent of the element. Otherwise jQuery doesn't select the element and delegation fails.

Event handlers are bound only to the currently selected elements; they must exist on the page at the time your code makes the call to .on().

However, in case that element is static, you are selecting the element too soon, you should wait for DOM to be ready.

$(document).ready(function(){
   var $contain = $('#contain'); //going to use a lot
   $contain.on('click','li.two', function(){
       console.log('working');
       //plus do other stuff
   });
})
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The ul is generated from a server side include, but it does not change. Doesn't php generate that on the server before the browser even gets to it? Or am I missing the boat? –  absentx Jan 4 '13 at 20:55
    
@absentx That's true, browser receives the generated content, it seems you should listen to the DOM ready event, I have updated the answer. –  Vohuman Jan 4 '13 at 21:01
    
That was indeed the problem and I had a feeling I was overlooking something simple...yet another lesson in DOM management/manipulation that is always helpful. Thanks again. –  absentx Jan 5 '13 at 2:44

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