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Can someone explain to me why undefined is being printed only in firefox for document.write on the last line. When the first document.write is removed however it works great, and it seems to be like this only in Firefox.

document.write("Hello <br />");
myVar = 55;
document.write(window.myVar);

http://jsfiddle.net/43pbj/1/

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1  
It works fine if you remove window., so why can't you just do that? –  Dylan Cross Jan 4 '13 at 20:31
1  
Because the variable should be accessible through the window object. It is on every other browser. –  nitro Jan 4 '13 at 20:32
    
Well, not all browsers agree with that unless you define it as that as MBJ said. –  Dylan Cross Jan 4 '13 at 20:33
1  
The bug is that if you comment out the first line in FF, then it will work, but that only applies for Firefox. The code above from what I can tell is valid and legal code. –  nitro Jan 4 '13 at 20:35
    
Proper usage of jsFiddle matters too. –  Sparky Jan 4 '13 at 21:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's because of jsfiddle. You have the script wrapped in an anonymous function that's bound to the page's onload event with mootools's addEvent() function. For some reason running the code in an onload event causes the scope not be window in Firefox.

If you look at the page source the code looks like this:

<script type='text/javascript'>//<![CDATA[ 
window.addEvent('load', function() {
document.write("Hello <br />");
myVar = 55;
document.write(window.myVar);

});//]]> 
</script>

If you run the same script without any libraries and not in any event it works fine: http://jsfiddle.net/43pbj/4/

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You're calling myVar from the window object, but not setting it as such.

Do either:

window.myVar = 55;
document.write(window.myVar);

or:

var myVar = 55;
document.write(myVar);

EDIT:

Just as a note, I would go with the second option unless you absolutely need the variable attached to the window object.

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var myVar = 55; if defined in global namespace, it attaches to the global window by default. –  Pranav 웃 Jan 4 '13 at 20:36
    
@PranavKapoor well the issue is resolved when you define it with window.myVar, so apparently that isn't entirely true for all browsers - whether it be intentional or just a bug. –  Dylan Cross Jan 4 '13 at 20:38
    
@DylanCross : Variable Declaration at Mozilla Docs –  Pranav 웃 Jan 4 '13 at 20:41
    
@PranavKapoor Sure it may say that, but you can't deny that redefining it as so doesn't for some reason fix the issue... because it does, so it's clear that that is the issue... –  Dylan Cross Jan 4 '13 at 20:44

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