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Okay so, I'm making a program for my programming class and I am trying to get it so when I type the column and row, it will get an output showing a multiplication table. Here is an example for you to visualize it: Sample run output for printTable(4,6):

Example:

Now, here is my code:

 import java.util.Scanner;

 public class Pictures {

public static int row;
public static int column;
public static Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);

public static void main(String[] args){
int x = 1;
int y = 1;

System.out.println("Input Row: ");
row = input.nextInt();
System.out.println("Input Column: ");
column = input.nextInt();

for(x = 1; x < row; x++){
    System.out.print(x * y +  "    ");

    for(y = 1 ; y < column; y++){

        System.out.print(y * x + "    ");
    }
    System.out.println();   
}   
}
}

Now, when I input the row 5, and column 5, my output looks like this:

1    1    2    3    4    
10    2    4    6    8    
15    3    6    9    12    
20    4    8    12    16

I know I am not seeing something rather simple, but I just don't understand why this is happening. If anyone could offer a suggestion, it would help a lot.

Thanks, Sully

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3  
You should step through your code in the debugger, and inspect the values of all your variables as you go. –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 4 '13 at 20:39
3  
Why do you print x*y outside second loop? –  Nikita Beloglazov Jan 4 '13 at 20:40
1  
Hot licks, I'm sorry that I offended you with my question. Please consider that I am a 10th grade novice with programming. –  Sully Brooks Jan 4 '13 at 20:44
    
If you followed the best practice of declaring variables only when they're needed, and initialize them at the same time, you wouldn't have this bug. –  JB Nizet Jan 4 '13 at 20:44
    
@JBNizet I did originally initialize the variables inside the for loop, like: "for (int x = 0.........)" but I figured i'd try some new ways of going about this –  Sully Brooks Jan 4 '13 at 20:48
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closed as too localized by Oli Charlesworth, jlordo, A--C, valex, Ed Heal Jan 5 '13 at 7:12

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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For learning purposes, use a debugger to understand your code.

To fix it, delete those lines:

int x = 1;
int y = 1;

and have your loops like:

for(int x = 1; x < row; x++){
    // System.out.print(x * y +  "    "); // no print needed here
    for(int y = 1 ; y < column; y++){
        System.out.print(y * x + "\t");
    }
    System.out.println(); 
}  

Here is a link to the section of the Oracle Java tutorials explaining for loops. Thank's Mike for mentioning the even spacing in the comments. Updated the code.

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Your answer is correct, but has a small mistake. You should change System.out.print(x * y + " ") to System.out.print(x + " "), because yis undefined. –  MikhailSP Jan 4 '13 at 20:49
    
Thank you for this! It worked for the most part. Nothing wrong on your part but its printing only 4 rows rather than the 5 that I input. Should I set x and y to 0 instead? –  Sully Brooks Jan 4 '13 at 20:50
    
No, that would produce 0s in the output because of the multiplication. Replace the < (smaller) in the condition with <= (smaller or equals) –  jlordo Jan 4 '13 at 20:51
    
Okay, thanks a ton for this. it worked! –  Sully Brooks Jan 4 '13 at 20:53
    
You will also need to change System.out.print(y * x + " "); to System.out.print(y * x + "\t"); if you wish to get the even spacing shown in the example. –  Mike Jan 4 '13 at 20:59
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When you do the

System.out.print(x * y + " ");

the second time, y = 5 as a result of the for loop. Thus 2 *5 = 10.

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If you want to get 4 rows you want to show rows, 1,2,3, and 4. If you stop your loop at < 4 (rather than <= 4) you'll miss the last row, and column. This is what folks call a fencepost error .

Try something like so:

for(int x = 1; x <= row; x++)

Also, the first print you don't yet have a good y value. You want both x and y to be valid, so only print inside the inner loop.

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for(x = 1; x < row; x++){
    System.out.print(x * y +  "    ");
    for(y = 1 ; y < column; y++){
        System.out.print(y * x + "    ");
    }
    System.out.println();   
}   

The first print() is unneeded, and you need to change the comparison such that row and column are valid values for x and y respectively (i.e. used <= rather than <. Also, you will want to use "\t" (the tab character) to space out the columns, rather than " ", so that numbers with a different number of digits do not cause the columns to skew. This should produce the expected results.

for(x = 1; x <= row; x++){
    for(y = 1 ; y <= column; y++){
        System.out.print(y * x + "\t");
    }
    System.out.println();   
}   

Output of 4,6 with " "...

1    2    3    4    5    6    
2    4    6    8    10    12    
3    6    9    12    15    18    
4    8    12    16    20    24    

Output of 4,6 with "\t"...

1   2   3   4   5   6   
2   4   6   8   10  12  
3   6   9   12  15  18  
4   8   12  16  20  24  
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The first print is wrong, since it uses the y value from the previous for loop.

Change it to:

for(x = 1; x <= row; x++){
  System.out.print(x +  "    ");
  for(y = 1 ; y <= column; y++){
    System.out.print(y * x + "    ");
  }
  System.out.println();
}

Update: the loop end was also <, while they should be <= (since they're 1-based). I updated that in the fragment above.

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I see, you are skipping the last row because of the <. I'll update the code above. –  Frank van Puffelen Jan 4 '13 at 20:47
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